Internationaal nieuws 29 november - 5 december 2015


Drugging bacteria

Metformin, the drug most often used to treat type 2 diabetes, has a greater effect on gut microbes than the disease itself. The finding, by scientists at EMBL and colleagues, has implications for studies searching for links between our microbiomes and disease. Published today in Nature, the study points to new approaches for understanding how metformin works, and minimising the side effects of a drug that patients take in high doses for many years.

Lees verder


Low-toxin anticancer compounds may mitigate side effects of chemotherapy

Patented by James I University of Castellón, the new compounds have proven particularly effective against breat and colon cancer cells.

Lees verder


A step towards gene therapy against intractable epilepsy

By delivering genes for a certain signal substance and its receptor into the brain of test animals with chronic epilepsy, a research group at Lund University in Sweden together with colleagues at University of Copenhagen Denmark has succeeded in considerably reducing the number of epileptic seizures among the animals. The test has been designed to as far as possible mimic a future situation involving treatment of human patients.

Lees verder


Cannabis Increases the Noise in Your Brain

Several studies have demonstrated that the primary active constituent of cannabis, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (?9-THC), induces transient psychosis-like effects in healthy subjects similar to those observed in schizophrenia. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not clear.

Lees verder


Microwaves Improve Green Workings of Materials Used to Clean Wastewater

New method to make photocatalysts saves energy and time

Lees verder


'Nanobombs' might deliver agents that alter gene activity in cancer stem cells

Researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute have developed nanoparticles that swell and burst when exposed to near-infrared laser light. Such 'nanobombs' might overcome a biological barrier that has blocked development of agents that work by altering the activity -- the expression -- of genes in cancer cells. The agents might kill cancer cells outright or stall their growth.

Lees verder


'Purpose in life' linked to lower mortality and cardiovascular risk

People who have a higher sense of purpose in life are at lower risk of death and cardiovascular disease, reports a pooled data analysis in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Lees verder


Targeting protein homeostasis holds potential to treat solid tumors and blood cancers

In data published in two journals as well as to be presented at the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting & Exposition, scientists identified an orally available molecule, CB-5083, that targeting protein homeostasis has the potential to treat solid tumors and blood cancers.

Lees verder


Mental health courts significantly reduce repeat offenses, jail time

New research finds that mental health courts are effective at reducing repeat offending, and limiting related jail time, for people with mental health problems -- especially those who also have substance use problems.

Lees verder


Graphene oxide could make stronger dental fillings

Graphene oxide could be used to make super strong dental fillings that don't corrode, according to a new study published in Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces.

Lees verder


Researchers isolate cells implicated with breast cancer-derived brain tumors

Researchers from the Houston Methodist Research Institute have isolated genetic signatures of some circulating tumor cells found in breast cancer, which one day may lead to a preventive treatment for metastatic cancer cells.

Lees verder


How to wake a sleeping cancer cell -- and why you might want to

Cancer cells that lie 'snoozing' in the skeleton can be awakened by changes in the bone that surrounds them, Australian scientists have shown. In a world first, researchers from the Garvan Institute of Medical Research have used state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to watch cancer cells sleep within living bone over a period of months. They show that cancer cells can be 'woken up' when bone tissue is broken down around them, suggesting new possibilities for treating metastatic cancer in bone.

Lees verder


Neurotoxic effects of chemotherapies on cognition in breast cancer survivors

Cancer-related cognitive impairment is often referred to as 'chemobrain' and anthracycline-based chemotherapy may have greater negative effects on particular cognitive domains and brain network connections than nonanthracycline-based regimens, according to an article published online by JAMA Oncology.

Lees verder


Weaker breaths in kids linked to early pesticide exposure

A new study links early exposure to organophosphate pesticides -- widely used in agriculture -- to reduced lung capacity in kids. The findings are the first to show exposure effects on lung health in children.

Lees verder


Patient mood can impact medical procedure results

Feeling high levels of distress, fear and hostility prior to undergoing an angioplasty or other interventional radiology procedure may lead to a poor outcome, according to new research.

Lees verder


Are blood clots in patients with heart-assist pumps decreasing or on the rise in 2015?

Evidence-based data indicate that LVADs have saved many lives. However, starting in 2011 device failures due to clots forming inside these pumps (pump thrombosis) appeared to rise dramatically. There is some indication that these failures may now be declining, but data analysis and interpretation are complex. In the current issue of The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation several studies suggest that management of patients with LVADs may have to change.

Lees verder


The Sun could release flares 1000x greater than previously recorded

The Sun demonstrates the potential to superflare, new research into stellar flaring suggests. Led by the University of Warwick, the research has found a stellar superflare on a star observed by NASA's Kepler space telescope with wave patterns similar to those that have been observed in solar flares.Superflares are thousands of times more powerful than those ever recorded on the Sun, and are frequently observed on some stars.

Lees verder


Fries with a side of acrylamide

French fry lovers, beware! You may be exposed to a chemical more commonly associated with heavy industry than crispy fried potatoes. Fortunately, researchers are finding ways to reduce that exposure.

Lees verder


Little known about children living with HIV-infected adults in Africa

Despite the focus in recent decades on fighting the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Sub-Saharan Africa, a new study reveals that little is known about one of the area's most vulnerable populations: children living in households with HIV-infected adults.

Lees verder


New studies create better understanding of cancer-spreading enzymes

Researchers at the University of Missouri have determined a detailed structural view of one of these enzymes, called MMP7, as it binds to the membranes, or surfaces, of cancer cells. This understanding could lead to better treatments for cancer.

Lees verder


Transcendental Meditation and lifestyle modification increase telomerase, new study finds

A new study published in PLOS ONE found that the Transcendental Meditation technique and lifestyle changes both appear to stimulate genes that produce telomerase, an enzyme associated with reduced blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and mortality. Both stress reduction approaches prevented telomere deterioration, suggesting a possible underlying mechanism for the improved cardiovascular health in a high-risk population.

Lees verder


Scientists design a new method for screening cancer cells

UCLA life scientists and colleagues today present a new method they developed to screen cancer cells and identify small molecules that can make cancer cells less lethal.

Lees verder


Exploring the limits for high-performance LEDs and solar cells

Förster resonant energy transfer is a radiationless transmission of energy that occurs on the nanometer scale. The process promotes energy rather than charge transfer, providing an alternative contactless pathway that avoids some of the losses caused by charge recombination at the interface. Researchers in Cyprus and in Greece have conducted an investigation on how various structural and electronic parameters affect FRET, and they present their work in this week's The Journal of Chemical Physics.

Lees verder


New study shows high use of complementary therapies by cancer inpatients

Patients hospitalized for cancer treatment commonly use complementary and integrative health (CIH) approaches such as nutritional supplements, special diets, and massage according to a new study. More than 95 percent of patients expressed interest in at least one of these types of therapies if offered during their hospital stay, as reported in the article published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.

Lees verder


Scientists discover that the immune system affects gut bacteria evolution

In a study published this week in Nature Communications, researchers from the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia discovered that when the immune system of the host is compromised, the composition of the gut bacteria changes, and the pace and predictability of the process of adaptation of these bacteria are affected. This study suggests that the treatment of intestine pathologies that result from impaired immune system, such as the inflammatory bowel disease, may require therapies based on personalized medicine.

Lees verder


Money affects children's behavior, even if they don't understand its value

The act of handling money makes young children work harder and give less, according to new research published by the University of Minnesota's Carlson School of Management and University of Illinois at Chicago.

Lees verder


Oxytocin has different effects on stress in male and female mice

Clinical trials are testing whether oxytocin, sometimes called the 'love hormone' for its role in intimacy and social bonding, has potential as a treatment for anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. New research by behavioral neuroscientists Michael Steinman, Brian Trainor and colleagues at UC Davis, suggests oxytocin may have different effects in men and women -- and in certain circumstances the hormone may actually trigger anxiety.

Lees verder


Mitochondria affect stress responses

Mitochondria, the tiny structures inside our cells that generate energy, may also play a previously unrecognized role in mind-body interactions. Based on new studies of stress responses in animals, this insight may have broad implications for human psychology and for the biology of psychiatric and neurological diseases.

Lees verder


Evidence suggests contact sports played by amateurs increase risk of degenerative disorder

Scientists have recently found evidence that professional football players are susceptible to a progressive degenerative disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repetitive brain trauma.

Lees verder


Study highlights the importance of physical activity and aerobic exercise for healthy brain function

Regardless of gender, young adults who have greater aerobic fitness also have greater volume of their entorhinal cortex, an area of the brain responsible for memory. Better aerobic fitness however does not appear to impact hippocampal volume, another area in the brain responsible for memory.

Lees verder


Study finds flame retardant exposure higher in infants than adults

In October, Macy's joined a growing list of major retail stores that have pledged to stop selling furniture containing flame retardants, which research suggests could cause developmental problems. Despite the trend, however, it could take years before widespread exposure declines. And now, a study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology has revealed more bad news: Infants could potentially be affected the most. The report also looks at potential exposure routes.

Lees verder


Neonicotinoid pesticides linked to butterfly declines in the UK

The use of neonicotinoid pesticides may be contributing to the decline of butterflies in the UK, a new study by the Universities of Stirling and Sussex in partnership with Butterfly Conservation and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology has revealed.

Lees verder


Coffee compounds that could help prevent type 2 diabetes identified

Much to coffee lovers' delight, drinking three to four cups of coffee per day has been shown to decrease the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Now, scientists report in ACS' Journal of Natural Products that they have identified two compounds that contribute to this health benefit. Researchers say that this knowledge could someday help them develop new medications to better prevent and treat the disease.

Lees verder


Activity and expression of acetylcholinesterase in PC12 cells exposed to intermittent 1.8 GHz 217-GSM mobile phone signal.

Our results provide the first evidence of effects on AChE activity after in vitro exposure of mammalian cells to the RF-EMF generated by GSM mobile phones, at the SAR value 2 W/kg. The obtained evidence promotes further investigations on AChE as a possible target of RF-EMF and confirm the ability of 1.8 GHz 217-GSM signal to induce biological effects in different mammalian cells.

Lees verder


Effects of mobile phone exposure (GSM 900 and WCDMA/UMTS) on polysomnography based sleep quality: An intra- and inter-individual perspective.

The results underline that sleep of individuals can be affected differently. The observations found here may indicate an underlying thermal mechanism of RF-EMF on human REM sleep. Nevertheless, the effect of an increase in stage R sleep in one third of the individuals does not necessarily indicate a disturbance of sleep.

Lees verder


Soil contamination with silver nanoparticles reduces Bishop pine growth and ectomycorrhizal diversity on pine roots.

Soil contamination by silver nanoparticles (AgNP) is of potential environmental concern but little work has been carried out on the effect of such contamination on ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF). EMF are essential to forest ecosystem functions as they are known to enhance growth of trees by nutrient transfer. In this study, soil was experimentally contaminated with AgNP (0, 350 and 790 mg Ag/kg) and planted with Bishop pine seedlings. The effect of AgNP was subsequently measured, assessing variation in pine growth and ectomycorrhizal diversity associated with the root system. After only 1 month, the highest AgNP level had significantly reduced the root length of pine seedlings, which in turn had a small effect on above ground plant biomass. However, after 4 months growth, both AgNP levels utilised had significantly reduced both pine root and shoot biomass. For example, even the lower levels of AgNP (350 mg Ag/kg) soil, reduced fresh root biomass by approximately 57 %. The root systems of the plants grown in AgNP-contaminated soils lacked the lateral and fine root development seen in the control plants (no AgNP). Although, only five different genera of EMF were found on roots of the control plants, only one genus Laccaria was found on roots of plants grown in soil containing 350 mg AgNP/kg. At the higher levels of AgNP contamination, no EMF were observed. Furthermore, extractable silver was found in soils containing AgNP, indicating potential dissolution of silver ions (Ag+) from the solid AgNP.

Lees verder


As NY State Probes Exxon, Oil Giant Targets the Journalists Who Exposed Climate Change Cover-Up

Exxon accused Columbia University journalism students of producing inaccurate and misleading articles.

Lees verder


Safer way to do gene editing

Scientists say they have fine tuned a gene editing method to make it safer and more accurate - vital if it is to be used in humans to cure inherited diseases or inborn errors.

Lees verder


Leaked Memo Reveals EU Plan To Suspend Schengen For Two Years

Earlier today we reported that in a dramatic and, what to many may seem unfair variation of "carrot and stick" negotiations conducted by European bureaucrats, the EU threatened Greece with indefinite suspension from the Schengen passport-free travel zone unless it overhauls its response to the migration crisis by mid-December, as frustration mounted over Athens’ reluctance to accept outside support.

Lees verder


Health claims in sugary cereal packaging target of new lawsuit

Consumers are increasingly veering away from the many boxes of processed ingredients, packed with sugar. But that doesn't necessarily mean we're making healthier breakfast choices.

Lees verder


Toddlers exposed to pot before birth have better vision at age 4, study finds

Research conducted in part by the University of Waterloo found babies whose mothers consumed marijuana while pregnant had an improved type of vision by age four.

Lees verder


This Is How Much Water You Waste When You Throw Away Food

Smithsonian by Divya Abhat Source: Justin Goring Tossing an apple is like pouring 25 gallons of water down the drain, and the average American does that 17 times a year Food waste is a staggering problem. In 2010, close to 133 billion pounds, or a little over $160 billion worth of food, wound up in U.S. landfills. “There’s no benefit to wasting food,” says Kai Olson-Sawyer, a senior research and policy analyst at GRACE CommunicationsThe post This Is How Much Water You Waste When You Throw Away Food appeared first on Cornucopia Institute.

Lees verder


Pesticide May be Reason Butterfly Numbers are Falling in UK, Says Study

The Guardian by Patrick Barkham Wall Butterfly Source: Tony Morris Dramatic decline in population associated with increased use of controversial neonicotinoid chemicals on farms Neonicotinoids may be contributing towards the disappearance of butterflies from the countryside, according to the first scientific study to examine the effect of the controversial agricultural pesticides on British butterflies. Researchers found that 15 of 17 species which commonly live on farmland – including the small tortoiseshell, small skipper and wall butterflyThe post Pesticide May be Reason Butterfly Numbers are Falling in UK, Says Study appeared first on Cornucopia Institute.

Lees verder


Earth has lost a third of arable land in past 40 years, scientists say

Experts point to damage caused by erosion and pollution, raising major concerns about degraded soil amid surging global demand for foodThe world has lost a third of its arable land due to erosion or pollution in the past 40 years, with potentially disastrous consequences as global demand for food soars, scientists have warned. New research has calculated that nearly 33% of the world’s adequate or high-quality food-producing land has been lost at a rate that far outstrips the pace of natural processes to replace diminished soil. Related: Can farms be good for nature without being organic? Related: Why seed banks aren't the only answer to food security Continue reading...

Lees verder


Sail Canada to take extra precaution in polluted waters at Rio Olympics.

Sail Canada’s executive director Paddy Boyd said the athletes will take every precaution to guard against getting sick from the polluted waters of Guanabara Bay, into which massive amounts of the city’s untreated sewage flows.

Lees verder


GE fined $2.25M fine for hazardous waste burning in Waterford.

General Electric Co. will pay a $2.25 million civil penalty for potentially releasing unsafe levels of air pollution from a hazardous waste incinerator at its former silicone plant in Waterford.

Lees verder


Healthy Diet Helps to Reduce Risk of Colon Cancer

About 20% of people in low-income communities who die of colon cancer could have been saved through early screening and proper diet.

Lees verder


How consumer outrage is reducing child labor in Ghana

There's no simple 'how-to' on getting kids out of slavery. But in cocoa villages in Ghana and, to a lesser extent, Cote d'Ivoire, the appeal is economic -- and the results have been startling.

Lees verder


Death threats, libel, and lies – Part 4 Kevin Folta’s toxic legacy

Kevin Folta claims he’s withdrawn from the GMO debate but Jonathan Matthews warns about the continuing influence of his cult

Lees verder


Scientists challenge EFSA claim of glyphosate safety

Over 90 international scientists call German government report underpinning EFSA decision not credible.

Lees verder


Couch potato lifestyle could damage intelligence in later life

A lazy lifestyle in early adulthood could damage cognitive ability in middle age, a study suggests

Lees verder


Type 2 diabetes can be cured through weight loss, Newcastle University finds

Type 2 diabetes is traditionally seen as a chronic condition but weight loss reverses the disease, scientists have shown

Lees verder


Heliotherapy - Using sunlight to cure disease

(NaturalNews) The debate about whether sunlight is good or bad for us, and how much we actually need, continues. Like many considerations related to our health, the key is "moderation." Solar Power for Optimal Health, written by Marc Sorenson, says that not only is sunlight crucial...

Lees verder


What the cancer industry is missing - boosting a patient's own healing abilities

(NaturalNews) It's predicted that 38 percent of women and 43 percent of men will develop some type of cancer over their lifetime; however, internationally recognized nutrition and cancer expert Dr. Patrick Quillin says practicing optimal nutrition can reduce the risk of developing...

Lees verder


CDC exposed as private corporation colluding with Big Pharma to defraud American taxpayers - see the evidence

(NaturalNews) The illusory notion that the federal regulatory agency known as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is somehow a public entity working on behalf of the people to protect us all from disease is simply laughable.The CDC, by definition, is a private...

Lees verder


Adrenal fatigue - A natural solution revealed

(NaturalNews) The old way of 'treating' disease symptoms with toxic medications, produced by the pharmaceutical industry, has failed to successfully eliminate the true cause of most chronic health conditions – especially adrenal fatigue. Simply put, toxic drugs will only add...

Lees verder


CDC scientists held meeting to destroy autism-vaccine documents, reveals CDC whistleblower

(NaturalNews) The results of a 2004 study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) discovered a significant link between the MMR vaccine (measles, mumps and rubella) and autism in African American boys vaccinated under or around the age 36 months; however, if it...

Lees verder


Global warming HOAX unravels... globalist science fraud engineered to control humanity, not save it

(NaturalNews) The global warming being pushed on us by global governments is a science fraud. The satellite data purported to show a warming "trend" over the last hundred years has been fraudulently altered to show a warming trend where none exists.What the data really show are...

Lees verder


Effects of Exposure of Females to Stress During Adolescence Are Transmitted Not Only to Children but Also to Grandchildren

"Our studies suggest that there are processes, unrelated to maternal care, that can explain how information is transmitted from generation to generation," said Dr. Inna Gaisler-Salomon of the University of Haifa, who conducted the study

Lees verder


Can Slow Walking Speed in Elderly Signal Alzheimer's Disease Hallmarks?

How fast elderly people walk may be related to the amount of amyloid they have built up in their brains, even if they don't yet have symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the December 2, 2015, online issue of Neurology(r), the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Lees verder


Global Food, Farming and Environmental Justice Groups to Put Monsanto on Trial for Crimes Against Human Health and the Environment in the International People’s Court in The Hague

One of the world’s most criminally corrupt corporations will finally get its day in court—and it won’t be pretty.

Lees verder


90% of American Moms Want Labels on GMO Food

By an overwhelming margin, American voters say consumers should have the right to know if their food is genetically modified, with 89 percent in support of mandatory GMO labeling, according to a new national poll.

Lees verder


Foreshadowing TPP Troubles — Trade Ruling Nixes Dolphin-Safe Tuna Label

Corporate trade deals like the World Trade Organization (WTO) have been used to undermine or eliminate U.S. consumer and environmental rules for years, and last week it took a swipe at both. A WTO trade tribunal ruled against the U.S. dolphin-safe tuna labels.

Lees verder


Putting out Indonesia’s Fires

Every year, forest fires ravage Indonesia, causing massive environmental, social, and economic devastation. Perhaps even more alarming is the climate impact – and this year's fires are the largest in nearly 20 years.

Lees verder


Antimicrobial Resistance on the Global Agenda

Last month, the leaders of the G-20 agreed to put antimicrobial resistance on the group's agenda. The decision came not a moment too soon, as it coincided with some very bad news: the discovery of a strain of bacteria that is resistant even to antibiotics of last resort.

Lees verder


Even low-levels of common metal linked to weaker bones

(Reuters Health) - Low levels of exposure to the metal cadmium may increase the risk of weaker bones and fractures in elderly men, a Swedish study suggests.

Lees verder


Improving baby's sleep during weaning through novel dietary fibres

A University of Otago scientist has received $1M to lead research into extending energy release from food to allow a better night’s sleep for babies during weaning.

Lees verder


Scientist Known for Research Linking GM Feed with Cancerous Growth in Rats Wins Defamation and Forgery Court Cases

Séralini, the scientist known for his research linking GM feed with cancerous tumor growth in rats, has been through hell and back with his research on GMOs, but now it seems things are looking a little better for him. The…

Lees verder


James Hansen: Fracking is ‘Screwing Your Children and Grandchildren’

Speaking at the COP21 climate conference in Paris, Dr. James Hansen, one of the world’s most...

Lees verder


Exxon Targets Journalists Who Exposed Massive Climate Cover Up

ExxonMobil has launched a full-throttled "bully" campaign against ...

Lees verder


How Probiotics Can Help You Lose Weight

Studies suggest that probiotics can help you lose weight and...

Lees verder


What More Will Autism Brains Tell Us?

Most of the studies and investigations about Autism brains remind me of Bill Murray trapped in Groundhog Day --- frustrating, the same day, every day.

Lees verder


Cancer theorist Paul Davies to speak on the disease's evolutionary history

It's time to start managing cancer as an ancient chronic disease rather than something to eradicate, says Professor Paul Davies.

Lees verder


Concern Over Drug Industry Involvement At India’s “Health Camps”

Drug companies have been running health screenings in India as a way to increase their market share, according to a report in The BMJ.

Lees verder


Stored Fat Fights Against The Body’s Attempts To Lose Weight

Fat cells produce a protein called sLR11 that actively resists efforts to burn fat, scientists say.

Lees verder


The Epigenetic Switch That Triggers Fat Cell Maturation

How do preadipocytes maintain plurpotency while remaining poised for differentiation? A unique bivalent epigenetic switch may be the answer.

Lees verder


MRI Scans Reveal How The Brains Of Happy People Are Different

Researchers in Japan have identified an area of the brain associated with feelings of happiness using MRIs.

Lees verder


A Self-Powering Suit For Athletes And The Elderly

Researchers in Japan have developed a lightweight assisted mobility device that could be useful for both the elderly and athletes.

Lees verder


Can Sound Vibrations Reduce Pesticide Use?

Could sound be the key to reducing the toxic load of our favorite citrus fruit? Florida’s orange groves are riddled with pests. In fact, the orange industry lost $3.6 billion in their fight against pests between 2006 and 2012. Pesticides have long been the favored way of handling these bacteria-carrying insects but scientists are concerned […]

Lees verder


The Effects of Aspartame on the Brain

The NIH-AARP study of Americans followed for years found that frequent consumption of sweetened beverages, especially diet drinks, may increase depression risk among older adults. Whether soda, fruit-flavored drinks or iced tea, those artificially sweetened drinks appeared to carry higher risk. There was a benefit in coffee drinkers compared to non-drinkers, but if they add […]

Lees verder


A Gluten-Free Diet Will Not Help Your Child’s Autism

Despite gluten-free diets going mainstream, they do have their place. Not only are they fundamental for those with celiac disease, the issues of non-celiac gluten intolerance appear to be very real (if not indicative of some other hidden food intolerances). But is gluten a problem for your autistic child? Will putting your child on a gluten-free diet help […]

Lees verder


Regular Soda or Diet Soda, Which is Worse for Your Teeth?

A new study reveals a surprising result when comparing the effects regular soda and diet soda have on tooth decay.

Lees verder


Cancer 'prevents muscle fibres contracting properly, reducing heart function'

Experts at the Royal Brompton Hospital in London found all cancer patients suffer from impaired heart function and advised they should undergo cardiovascular testing before treatment.

Lees verder


Drinking too much alcohol? You might need to 'DRIET'

Regularly drinking too much alcohol leads to anxiety, depression, thread veins, brittle nails, dry hair, weight gain and a weakened immune system, an infographic by driet.co.uk shows.

Lees verder


Caffeine and sugar combo causes glucose and insulin levels to 'spike' in teens

Research performed at Calgary University in Canada found teenagers who consume the popular drinks may suffer subsequent problems bringing blood sugar levels down to normal.

Lees verder


'Distracted dining' leads to overeating and obesity, study says

Researchers from the University of Illinois said so-called 'distracted dining' may be as dangerous to health as losing concentration on a motorway.

Lees verder


'Pleasure' gene dictates if smokers can quit, say scientists

Scientists at Zhejiang University in China found people with a specific variation of the Taq1A gene found it harder to quit. The gene helps regulate production of dopamine, the pleasure and reward hormone.

Lees verder


Childbirth is 'MORE traumatic than endurance sports' say University of Michigan scientist

Researchers at the University of Michigan are using sports medicine to treat injuries sustained during childbirth, saying some women sustain traumatic pelvic injuries that just don't heal.

Lees verder


Scientists call for a ban on genetically modifying human embryos

US scientists are calling for a global ban on gene editing technology, since it could lead to a generation of 'enhanced' children, according to a report from the Center for Genetics and Society.

Lees verder


Our Sun Could Release Superflares As Powerful As a Billion Megaton Bombs

By studying a nearby sun-like star, astronomers have concluded that the Sun is capable of releasing solar flares a thousand times greater than anything previously recorded. Scientists say the chances of this are quite slim, but warn that such an event would threaten life on Earth.Read more...

Lees verder


A Cure for Rosacea?

There is no cure for the redness and bumps on the nose and cheeks caused by rosacea, but patients can manage symptoms by avoiding triggers that set off flare-ups and by using appropriate medications.

Lees verder


How Paint Poisons Us and How to Avoid It

It turns out that many of the new lead-free paints (lead paints stopped being used in homes in 1978) we are using are also highly toxic.

Lees verder


Trusting your gut can make less likely to cheat

Researchers from the University of Missouri have shown that those who follow their gut intuition, may be less likely to cheat. 100 participants were studied to determine these results.

Lees verder


University of Turku find that people who take chances have more white matter in their brain

Researchers in Finland believe their results are caused by the fact that people who are active and seek out challenges stimulate their brains far more than those who are cautious.

Lees verder


Science Says Facebook Is Ruining Your Life

A new study titled "Why Following Friends Can Hurt You" explains why Facebook is making you depressed.

Lees verder


Exercise vigorously, the more the better, experts say

Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease — and dying before our time.

Lees verder


Novel insights into genetic cause of autoimmune diseases

A collaboration between researchers at the Babraham Institute and the University of Manchester has mapped the physical connections occurring in the genome to shed light on the parts of the genome involved in autoimmune diseases. Using a new technique, called Capture Hi-C, the team revealed novel insights into how changes in the genetic sequence have a biological effect and increase the risk of disease.

Lees verder


Magnetic stimulation of the brain may help patients with cocaine addiction

Targeted magnetic pulses to the brain were shown to reduce craving and substance use in cocaine-addicted patients. The results of this pilot study, published in the peer-reviewed journal European Neuropsychopharmacology, suggest that this may become an effective medical treatment for patients with cocaine addiction, although a larger trial is needed to confirm the initial findings.

Lees verder


App to improve monitoring of psychotic patients' mental state and treatment adherence

Researchers at the Polytechnic University of Valencia have designed a new app that allows doctors to remotely monitor a psychotic outpatient’s mental state and improve overall adherence to treatment plans.

Lees verder


Palliative care - Music to make patients feel better

Music therapy can enhance terminally ill patients’ wellbeing and relaxation. This treatment has been known since the 1970s, but there is little scientific research on the subject. A recent randomized controlled trial by Marco Warth et al. in Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2015; 112: 788–94) analyzes the effect of music therapy on palliative care patients.

Lees verder


Folding your genes - New discovery sheds light on disease risk

New research from The University of Manchester and the Babraham Institute has revealed how gaps between genes interact to influence the risk of acquiring diseases such as arthritis and type 1 diabetes.

Lees verder


Advanced new camera can measure greenhouse gases

A camera so advanced that it can photograph and film methane in the air around us is now presented by a team of researchers from Linköping and Stockholm Universities. It can be an important part of the efforts to measure and monitor greenhouse gases.

Lees verder


A better way to change the fate of stem cells

Researchers at Harvard have developed a new, more precise way to control stem cell differentiation and production that is guided by the complex mechanical properties of living tissue. This new technique has promising applications in the realm of bone regeneration, growth and healing.

Lees verder


Fish could have emotions and consciousness

An international team of scientists with participants from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona has discovered that fish show "emotional fever", a slight increase in body temperature in situations of stress. Until now this fever had been linked to emotions and consciousness in mammals, birds and certain reptiles, but it had never been observed in fish.

Lees verder


Risk-takers are smarter

Do you often take chances and yet still land on your feet? Then you probably have a well-developed brain.

Lees verder


Survey finds 90 percent overlook key to weight loss

On December 1, Orlando Health will release the results of a national survey about weight loss barriers, which finds 90 percent of respondents discounted one of the most important factors -- your mind. Neuropsychologist Diane Robinson, PhD says the most crucial factor is your psychological relationship with food and exercise, yet the majority (60 percent) listed diet and exercise to be the biggest barriers of weight loss, and only 10 percent of people thought psychological well being was the biggest barrier to weight loss.

Lees verder


Higher cigarette taxes linked to fewer infant deaths

Higher taxes and prices for cigarettes are strongly associated with lower infant mortality rates in the United States, according to a new study from Vanderbilt University and the University of Michigan released Dec. 1 in the journal Pediatrics.

Lees verder


Gastric artery embolization shows promise in treating obesity

An interventional radiology technique shows promise for helping morbidly obese patients lose weight, according to the preliminary results of a new study.

Lees verder


Global warming may affect pesticide effectiveness

The effectiveness of permethrin, an important mosquito-fighting insecticide, may be impaired by global warming, according to a recent study in the Journal of Medical Entomology.

Lees verder


Discovery of an embryonic switch for cancer stem cell generation

An international team of scientists, headed by researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, report that decreases in a specific group of proteins trigger changes in the cancer microenvironment that accelerate growth and development of therapy-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). The findings are published Nov. 30 by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Lees verder


UofL scientists identify critical pathway to improve muscle repair

Researchers at the University of Louisville have described the role of TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), an adaptor protein and E3 ubiquitin ligase, in ensuring the vitality of stem cells that regenerate muscle tissue.

Lees verder


TGen and Barrow identify genes linked to stress-triggered heart disease

Researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Barrow Neurological Institute have for the first time identified genetic risk factors that are linked to stress-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC), a rare type of heart disease. Patients with SIC generally show no symptoms until they suffer some form of intense emotional or physiological distress. For this reason the disorder is sometimes referred to as 'broken heart syndrome.'

Lees verder


Researchers grow retinal nerve cells in the lab

Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a method to efficiently turn human stem cells into retinal ganglion cells, the type of nerve cells located within the retina that transmit visual signals from the eye to the brain.

Lees verder


Tracing a path toward neuronal cell death

Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a genetic model that is yielding new insights into what happens when astrocytes go awry.

Lees verder


Climate can grind mountains faster than they can be rebuilt

Researchers for the first time have attempted to measure all the material leaving and entering a mountain range over more than a million years and discovered that erosion caused by glaciation during ice ages can, in the right circumstances, wear down mountains faster than plate tectonics can build them.

Lees verder


Promising new antimicrobials could fight drug-resistant MRSA infection, study finds

A novel class of antimicrobials that inhibits the function of a key disease-causing component of bacteria could be effective in fighting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), one of the major drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, according to researchers at Georgia State University.

Lees verder


A better way to grow bone cells

Researchers at Harvard have developed a new, more precise way to control the differentiation of stem cells into bone cells. This new technique has promising applications in the realm of bone regeneration, growth and healing.

Lees verder


Safe form of estrogen helped multiple sclerosis patients avoid relapses in UCLA led clinical trial

Taking the pregnancy hormone estriol along with their conventional medications helped patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis avoid relapses.

Lees verder


Kids from high socioeconomic background more likely to rely on parental help as adults

A recent study finds that more than 40 percent of young adults no longer live with their parents, but still receive at least some financial support from mom and dad -- and this is particularly true for grown children from higher socioeconomic backgrounds.

Lees verder


Drug-resistant bacteria carried by nursing home patients focus of study

A recent study found that a small percentage of nursing home patients carrying multi drug-resistant bacteria are admitted to hospitals without showing symptoms caused by the bacteria. The research highlights the importance of hospital and nursing home infection control practices.

Lees verder


Processing facial emotions in persons with autism spectrum disorder

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often have difficulty recognizing and interpreting how facial expressions convey various emotions -- from joy to puzzlement, sadness to anger. This can make it difficult for an individual with ASD to successfully navigate social situations and empathize with others.

Lees verder


Female hormone supplements with estrogen and progestin linked to breast cancer risk

Postmenopausal African American women who use female hormone supplements containing estrogen and progestin ('combination' therapy) are at an increased risk for estrogen receptor positive breast cancer.

Lees verder


High concentration of CO2 protects sorghum against drought and improves seeds

The rising atmospheric concentration of CO2 is beneficial for the physiology of sorghum, an economically and nutritionally important crop grown worldwide. This is the conclusion of a study performed at the University of São Paulo in Brazil. The researchers found that when this plants were kept in a low-humidity environment, CO2 not only protected them against drought but also promoted a systemic adjustment in their metabolism that led their seeds to accumulate 60 percent more protein.

Lees verder


Scientists offer sweet solution to marathon fatigue

Health researchers have tested the effect of different energy drinks in staving off tiredness. Their findings reveal the importance of sucrose for endurance sports.

Lees verder


Waters are more polluted than tests say

Bodies of water are 'sinks', and thereby bind contaminants particularly well. If even slightly toxic concentrations in water are to be detected, the growth and swimming behavior of small crustaceans and copepods should be used for ecotoxicological assessments. This was the conclusion of a scientist from the TUM, who carried out a number of studies on the subject. She also confirmed that it is more informative to test several substances on various aquatic species, rather than carrying out individual toxicity tests.

Lees verder


Red clover genome to help restore sustainable farming

The Genome Analysis Centre in collaboration with IBERS, has sequenced and assembled the DNA of red clover to help breeders improve the beneficial traits of this important forage crop. The genome is published in Scientific Reports, a journal from the Nature publishing group.

Lees verder


Shining light on microbial growth and death inside our guts

For the first time, scientists can accurately measure population growth rates of the microbes that live inside mammalian gastrointestinal tracts, according to a new method reported in Nature Communications by a team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Harvard Medical School.

Lees verder


Immune cells make appendix 'silent hero' of digestive health

The research team, a collaborative partnership between the groups of Professor Gabrielle Belz of Melbourne's Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, and Professor Eric Vivier at the Centre d'Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy, France, found that innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are crucial for protecting against bacterial infection in people with compromised immune systems

Lees verder


DNA repair factor linked to breast cancer may also play a role in Alzheimer's disease

Mutant forms of breast cancer factor 1 are associated with breast and ovarian cancers but according to new findings, in the brain the normal BRCA1 gene product may also be linked to Alzheimer's disease. The results, published in Nature Communications, suggest that low levels of BRCA1 protein in the brain may contribute to dementia. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Lees verder


Not all Canadians feeling the heat of climate change

While Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is in Paris hammering out the details of the global fight against climate change, a new study out of the University of Montreal and the Trottier Energy Institute shows that Canadian attitudes are somewhat ambivalent.

Lees verder


How anxiety can kill your social status

Neuroscientists at EPFL identify a brain region that links anxious temperament to low social status. The researchers were able to tweak social hierarchy in animals using a regular vitamin.

Lees verder


Threats against children during the separation process for women in abusive relationships

Mothers who separate from their abusive partners are four times more likely to report threats to take or to harm their children than those who stay in the relationship, a study by Sam Houston State University found.

Lees verder


Aspirin targets key protein in neurodegenerative diseases

The active ingredient in aspirin blocks an enzyme that triggers cell death in several neurodegenerative diseases. More potent forms of salicylic aspirin exist, which may provide treatments for these diseases.

Lees verder


DNA repair protein BRCA1 implicated in cognitive function and dementia

Researchers from the Gladstone Institutes have shown for the first time that the protein BRCA1 is required for normal learning and memory and is depleted by Alzheimer's disease. BRCA1 is a key protein involved in DNA repair, and mutations that impair its function increase the risk for breast and ovarian cancer. The new study, published in Nature Communications, demonstrates that Alzheimer's disease is associated with a depletion of BRCA1 in neurons and that BRCA1 depletion can cause cognitive deficits.

Lees verder


TSRI scientists find protein 'talks' to wrong partners in cystic fibrosis

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found evidence that a mutant protein responsible for most cases of cystic fibrosis is so busy 'talking' to the wrong cellular neighbors that it cannot function normally and is prematurely degraded.

Lees verder


New study - Air evacuation may do further harm in patients with brain injury

Over the past 15 years, more than 330,000 US soldiers have suffered a traumatic brain injury. Many were evacuated by air for further treatment. A new study has found evidence that such air evacuations may pose a significant added risk, potentially causing more damage to already injured brains.

Lees verder


Testosterone replacement makes Type 2 diabetic men more sensitive to insulin

Men with Type 2 diabetes who have low testosterone levels can benefit significantly from testosterone treatment. That is the conclusion of University at Buffalo researchers who conducted the first randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of testosterone treatment in Type 2 diabetic men that comprehensively investigated the role of insulin resistance and inflammation, before and after treatment with testosterone.

Lees verder


Study offers insights to how ovarian cancer grows -- and potential to stop it

Can any cancer cell form another tumor, or is it only select cancer stem cells that give rise to new cancer cells? The answer, a new study finds, is both.

Lees verder


Inflammation is associated with bone growth

Researchers use induced pluripotent stem cells in a mouse model to show that diseased bone growth may be stimulated by a key molecule for inflammation. Inhibition of activin-A was found to repress the bone overgrowth typically seen in fibrodysplasia ossificans progressive. This model provides a new platform for drug discovery and bone growth.

Lees verder


Method of postoperative pain relief may influence recovery from total knee replacement surgery

A new study published today in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association compared outcomes from two types of postoperative pain control methods in a group of patients who had both of their knees replaced.

Lees verder


Beware, asthma sufferers - Migraines may worsen

Preexisting asthma may be a strong predictor of future chronic migraine attacks in individuals experiencing occasional migraine headaches, according to researchers from the University of Cincinnati, Montefiore Headache Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Vedanta Research.

Lees verder


Cardiorespiratory fitness in young adults associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease death

Cardiorespiratory fitness in young adults was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease and death but it was not associated with the development of coronary artery calcification in a long-term study of a large racially diverse group of US adults, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Lees verder


Why the End of Federal Pot Prohibition Could Be Only 5 Years Away

Is it possible that the walls will crumble even faster than we think?

Lees verder


Israel Backs Down from Claim That Google Agreed to Censor Palestinian Videos of Conflict

Israel held meetings with representatives of YouTube and Google to find ways of cooperating to censor Palestinian videos.

Lees verder


Organ donor law 'revolution' begins

Wales becomes the first nation in the UK to introduce a "revolutionary" new system to increase the number of organ donors.

Lees verder


NI abortion law 'breaches human rights'

The High Court in Belfast rules abortion legislation in Northern Ireland is in breach of human rights laws.

Lees verder


Radiation scan for babies in Fukushima

A new radiation scanner has been developed for babies in order to reassure Fukushima families affected by the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

Lees verder


French Government Using State Of Emergency As An Excuse To Round Up Climate Change Activists

In response to the attacks in Paris earlier this month, the French government has enacted a state of emergency. Like the War on Terror itself, this "state of emergency" has no discernible end in sight. The government has given itself an incredible amount of power for an indefinite period of time. When this power shift happens, abuse follows. The Guardian is reporting that the nation's law enforcement agencies are straying far from their original targets: those responsible for the attacks, along with anyone who appears to be sympathetic to the cause. The government now appears to be authorizing the arrest of anyone it can brand a troublemaker.

Lees verder


HSBC Whistleblower - The Biggest Bank Fraud in British History Carried Out on UK Shoppers and Covered Up

“In my position, as you can imagine, I’ve got a few enemies.” An anonymous tip off has contacted the DWP to suggest that Nicholas Wilson is frauding the benefits office. “They sent a letter calling me in for a compliance interview.” The irony is that Nicholas Wilson is a whistleblower, who has been trying to expose what would be the largest bank fraud in the history of the UK, totalling over £1bn. This is made up of illegal charges imposed by HFC Bank – previously a subsidiary of HSBC, onto unsuspecting UK customer debts on high street store cards.

Lees verder


Pesticides Stop Bumblebees from Pollinating Apple Trees, Research Shows

New findings on neonicotinoids have important implications as many food crops and wildflowers rely on bee pollination to reproduce.

Lees verder


A Fisherman’s Plan to Feed the World and Reduce Climate Change

One of the most prestigious prizes in sustainability, the Fuller Challenge, has been awarded to a commercial fisherman turned entrepreneur who once worked on factory trawlers pillaging the seas of fish.

Lees verder


The inner London schools where children breathe toxic air.

Nearly one in four school children in London are being forced to breathe air so filthy that it breaches EU legal limits, a shock report warned today.

Lees verder


Feeding Antibiotics to Healthy Animals Risks Children’s Health

The influential American Academy of Pediatrics, which numbers 64,000 pediatricians, has added its voice to the growing movement of public health professionals who are demanding an end to the dangerous overuse of antibiotics in meat and poultry production.

Lees verder


Electromagnetic fields from Wi-Fi routers affect liver enzymes

A study released in Nov 2015 suggests that exposure to electromagnetic fields from wifi routers may be bad for your health.

Lees verder


Type 2 diabetes mellitus linked to kidney stones

Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at higher risk for renal stones.

Lees verder


Multi-toxin resistance enables pink bollworm survival on Bt cotton

Two-toxin Bt cotton faces rapid redundancy in India, study finds.

Lees verder


Grandparent genes discovered by scientists

Grandparents are genetically programmed to care for their grandchildren, a new study suggests.

Lees verder


Washington attorney obliterates Big Pharma's vaccine propaganda while promoting real public health measures

(NaturalNews) Someone with proper know-how on the subject is finally doing what should have been done years ago, as legal redress for the many crimes against humanity that continue to be inflicted against the American people by bought-off health officials and corrupt drug corporations...

Lees verder


Tiny amounts of Monsanto's Roundup in food cause kidney and liver damage, cancerous tumors

(NaturalNews) Long-term consumption of tiny levels of Roundup herbicide that are lower than those permitted in U.S. water supplies can lead to liver and kidney damage caused in part by changes in gene expression. This is according to a study conducted by an international group of...

Lees verder


PLOS now engaging in blatant scientific censorship in order to bury evidence of Monsanto's corruption of the scientific community

(NaturalNews) In mid-August, the community blog PLOS Biology, which is administered by the journal Public Library of Science (PLOS), published a peer-reviewed post by two journalists arguing in favor of increased transparency by scientists, including public scrutiny of their emails...

Lees verder


BP oil spill killed off beach microbes, damaging entire ecosystem

(NaturalNews) The 2010 BP (Deepwater Horizon) oil spill caused long-lasting damage to the microbial ecosystem of Gulf beaches, suggests a study conducted by researchers from Georgia Tech and published in the ISME Journal on February 17.The April 2010 spill was the worst offshore...

Lees verder


Doctors admit flu vaccines are useless to people taking statin drugs - and both cause brain damage!

(NaturalNews) The US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) issued an apology to hundreds of millions of people late 2014, admitting that the flu shot didn't work. The strain of virus manufactured in the vaccine did not match the actual dominant flu virus strains going around. Flu viruses...

Lees verder


Feeling unusually exhausted lately? You may be suffering from iron deficiency

(NaturalNews) The most common nutritional deficiency in the world, iron deficiency, affects a sizable portion of the U.S., particularly infants, children, adolescents and expecting mothers. Often, the signs of having an iron deficiency aren't obvious; however, the symptoms can be...

Lees verder


Study Suggests New Strategy for Treating Rare Neurodegenerative Disorder Menkes Disease

Menkes disease arises from dysfunction in ATP7A, a protein that transports copper to cells, leading to brain development complications. Introducing working versions of ATP7A in the brain is considered the most direct therapeutic approach. However, a new study suggests that functioning ATP7A located elsewhere in the body, not necessarily the entire brain, can help treat the disorder.

Lees verder


Genetic Study of Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Could Lead to Better Treatments

Genetic variation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) appears to play a major role in determining how sick they will become and could provide a road map for more effective treatments.

Lees verder


Researchers Grow Retinal Nerve Cells in the Lab

Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a method to efficiently turn human stem cells into retinal ganglion cells, the type of nerve cells located within the retina that transmit visual signals from the eye to the brain.

Lees verder


Study Offers Insights to How Ovarian Cancer Grows - and Potential to Stop It

Can any cancer cell form another tumor, or is it only select cancer stem cells that give rise to new cancer cells? The answer, a new study finds, is both.

Lees verder


Lewy Body Dementia - Unfamiliar With This Common Disorder?

Lewy body dementia is the second most common type of dementia after Alzheimer's disease. But if you're not familiar with it, you're not alone. "Lewy body dementia is the most common disorder you've never heard of," says Bradley Boeve, M.D., a Mayo Clinic neurologist who will speak at the International Dementia with Lewy Bodies Conference Dec.

Lees verder


Foreshadowing TPP Troubles — Trade Ruling Nixes Dolphin-Safe Tuna Label

Corporate trade deals like the World Trade Organization (WTO) have been used to undermine or eliminate U.S. consumer and environmental rules for years, and last week it took a swipe at both. A WTO trade tribunal ruled against the U.S. dolphin-safe tuna labels.

Lees verder


Agent Orange Crops - EPA Turnaround on Toxic Herbicide

Citing "new information" on the herbicide's environmental toxicity, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on Wednesday announced it will revoke its controversial approval of Dow's Enlist Duo after determining that its combination of chemicals may be significantly more harmful than initially believed.

Lees verder


Going sugar-free may not be as simple as it sounds

Sugar has been blamed for the rise in obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and even types of cancer. But is the solution to cut it out of our diets? Is that even possible? And if not, what would be our best course of action? Here, we take a closer look at the issue.

Lees verder


Certain birth defects linked to abuse of infants and toddlers

(Reuters Health) - Babies with certain birth defects are much more likely to be abused as infants and toddlers than other young children, a U.S. study suggests.

Lees verder


Cancer patients may benefit from mindfulness-based therapy

(Reuters Health) - Mindfulness-based therapy may help ease anxiety and depression in some patients with cancer, a small research review suggests.

Lees verder


Facebook network and stress levels may be tied together

(Reuters Health) – A small study suggests that for adolescents, their number of Facebook friends may be related to their stress levels, with more than 300 friends associated with higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol.

Lees verder


Middle-aged mothers are Britain's worst 'hidden drinkers', experts warn

Two-fifths admit drinking as much or more than their grown-up children

Lees verder


Food manufacturers should halve the sugar content in their foods, experts say

Campaigners are calling for changes in the content of the food and drink sold in Britain's supermarkets in a bid to wean the public off its sweet tooth

Lees verder


Planetary Weapons and Military Weather Modification

“The key to geophysical warfare is the identification of the environmental instabilities to which the addition of a small amount of energy would release vastly greater amounts of energy.”

Lees verder


Chemtrails. The Realities of Geoengineering and Weather Modification

For anyone who looks up in the sky every so often, the reality of geoengineering—what are often referred to as “chemtrails”—can no longer be easily dismissed.

Lees verder


Should Our Children Be Genetically Engineered?

"Genetic modification of children was recently the stuff of...

Lees verder


Sea Shepherd Condemns Japan’s Plan to Slaughter 4,000 Minke Whales

Sea Shepherd warned Japan against resuming "research" whaling in the Antarctic in defiance of...

Lees verder


Michael Pollan - It’s Time to Choose Climate-Friendly Food

If we are serious about changing the climate, we need to get serious about...

Lees verder


27 Examples of Journalists Failing to Disclose Sources as Funded by Monsanto

Our review found 27 articles quoting university professors after they received Monsanto funding, but...

Lees verder


Global warming may affect pesticide effectiveness

The effectiveness of an important mosquito-fighting insecticide may be impaired by global warming, according to a recent study in the Journal of Medical Entomology. Two researchers from Montana State University, graduate student Shavonn Whiten and Dr. Robert Peterson, have shown that permethrin becomes less effective at killing the yellowfever mosquito (Aedes aegypti) as temperatures increase.

Lees verder


Ben Swann on Vaccine Safety and the Release of the #CDCwhistleblower Documents

Ben Swann began reporting on the problems in the vaccine program two years ago, and today on Age of Autism he discloses that Congressman Bill Posey has released to him the CDC documents turned over to Congress by Dr....

Lees verder


Putting The Brakes On Harmful Allergic Reactions

Cytokines such as interferon-beta, gamma and interleukin-27 help to switch off the long-lived innate immune response to prevent unnecessary inflammation, study shows.

Lees verder


Are Tablets Harming Our Toddlers?

You see it everywhere — 3 or 4-year-olds, on the cusp of tantrums, being satiated with a smartphone game or a cartoon on a tablet. It seems harmless enough, but is this early life tablet use harmful to our kids? According to a piece from Boston Children’s Hospital, not only can smartphone use inhibit your child’s […]

Lees verder


Pomegranate Seed Oil for Multiple Sclerosis

The pomegranate is a challenging fruit with a tough rind, and it appears that fighting appearance harbors seeds with potential to battle multiple sclerosis. Researchers have found that pomegranate seed oil contains an extremely strong antioxidant that inhibited demyelination in a mouse model for MS.

Lees verder


Parabens in Shampoo and Body Lotions Linked to Breast Cancer

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, report that shampoo and body lotion ingredients known as parabens may be linked to breast cancer. Although previous studies had looked at the impact of parabens alone, it now appears these chemical preservatives interact with other bodily changes, which makes them more dangerous.

Lees verder


Long-term apathy may be a sign of heart disease or much worse

Scientists believe long-term apathy could be a key sign of dozens of other conditions, including stroke and heart disease.

Lees verder


Having sex twice within an hour TRIPLES men's fertility

New research from North Middlesex Hospital suggests that having sex twice within an hour could triple a man’s chance of becoming a father.

Lees verder


Top scientist warns of prescription drugs washed down drains

A top doctor claims a range of medicines - from heart drugs to depression and hormone pills - are are indirectly finding their way into our drinking water, via the loo.

Lees verder


Experts warn toast and potatoes may also cause liver damage

Medical experts are warning that bread and potatoes can cause liver damage - because they create a protein called gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, which appears after alcohol.

Lees verder


'Going Gluten Free' study reveals diet 'reduces fatigue and increases energy levels'

The study by Aberdeen University's Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health was the largest ever undertaken in the UK. It found stomach cramps were lessened during the gluten-free spell.

Lees verder


Absent parents 'harm child's IQ' and their brains mature at a slower rate

A study in China found that the brains of youngsters left without direct parental care for more than six months mature at a slower rate, with a detrimental impact on intelligence.

Lees verder


Excessive use of Calpol linked to asthma and may also cause organ damage

Professor Alastair Sutcliffe, of University College London, said excessive use of Calpol and similar brands was linked to asthma and may also cause damage to the kidneys, liver and heart.

Lees verder


Contact lenses that change the curve in the eye can improve eye-sight

The latest trial results showed that special contact lenses designed to reshape the eye's curvature could be used like 'braces' to slow the development of short sightedness in children.

Lees verder


Mixing alcohol with diet drinks may boost breath alcohol levels

People who mix alcohol and diet drinks end up with more alcohol on their breath, according to a new study.

Lees verder


3 Fun and Friendly Ways to Cut Plastic Out of Your Life – and Help Others as Well!

Our love for plastic is out of control. In total, we produce an average of 300 million tons of plastic every year to meet the demand for everything from to-go... More

Lees verder


Drug map reveals the substances YOUR country is addicted to

New Zealand has the highest rate of drug treatment, with 4,392 people per million receiving help, mainly for cannabis, according to a map produced by Recovery Brands.

Lees verder


Vegetarian men no longer seen as 'less masculine than meat-eaters'

Men who consciously choose to be vegan, rather than eating the diet due to 'digestive issues', are seen as more effeminate, a study by Earlham College, Indiana, found.

Lees verder


Testosterone found to help men with diabetes

Boosting testosterone can significantly benefit many men with type 2 diabetes, new research suggests.

Lees verder


Fracking Companies Have Been Getting Worse About Disclosing The Chemicals They Use

According to a recently published paper, fracking companies have gotten worse about disclosing the kinds of chemicals they are using.

Lees verder


Add a nutrient boost to your post-workout snack

Chocolate milk is a great after-workout drink for pro athletes, but for normal exercisers a smoothie is a more satisfying choice

Lees verder


The Co-Benefits of Actions on Climate Change and Public Health

On the occasion of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP21), the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina has published a short statement on the co-benefits of actions on climate change and public health.

Lees verder


Extreme heatwaves may hit Europe in the short term

Regional climate projections for the two coming decades (2021-2040) suggest enhanced probability of heatwaves anywhere in Europe, which would be comparable or greater than the Russian heatwave in 2010 - the worst since 1950 - according to a JRC-led article published today in Environmental Research Letters. Using an improved heatwave index, the article also ranks the 10 record-breaking heatwaves that have struck the continent in the last 65 years.

Lees verder


Competitors can pose more of a threat than predators

When the biodiversity of an ecosystem is reduced by invasive species, competition for food plays a more important role than has previously been supposed. This was the conclusion of research conducted by Eawag and Bern University scientists on cichlid species in Lake Victoria, which suffered mass extinction following the introduction of the fish-eating Nile perch in the 1950s. The study also demonstrates the threat which rapid environmental changes pose to highly specialized species.

Lees verder


Synapse discovery could lead to new treatments for Alzheimer's disease

A team of researchers led by UNSW Australia scientists has discovered how connections between brain cells are destroyed in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease -- work that opens up a new avenue for research on possible treatments for the degenerative brain condition.

Lees verder


Earth's first ecosystems were more complex than previously thought, study finds

Computer simulations have allowed scientists to work out how a puzzling 555-million-year-old organism with no known modern relatives fed, revealing that some of the first large, complex organisms on Earth formed ecosystems that were much more complex than previously thought.

Lees verder


Rapid plankton growth in ocean seen as sign of carbon dioxide loading

A microscopic marine alga is thriving in the North Atlantic to an extent that defies scientific predictions, suggesting swift environmental change as a result of increased carbon dioxide in the ocean.

Lees verder


Don't forget plankton in climate change models, says study

Globally, phytoplankton absorb as much carbon dioxide as tropical rainforests and so understanding the way they respond to a warming climate is crucial.

Lees verder


Cognitive behavior therapy can help overcome fear of the dentist

Cognitive behavioral therapy could help many people with a dental phobia overcome their fear of visiting the dentist and enable them to receive dental treatment without the need to be sedated, according to a new study by King's College London.

Lees verder


Stem cell study paves the way for patient therapies

Stem cells that have been specifically developed for use as clinical therapies are fit for use in patients, an independent study of their genetic makeup suggests.

Lees verder


Study shows white matter damage caused by 'skunk-like' cannabis

Smoking high potency 'skunk-like' cannabis can damage a crucial part of the brain responsible for communication between the two brain hemispheres, according to a new study by scientists from King's College London and Sapienza University of Rome.

Lees verder


Personally tailored diabetes care reduces mortality in women but not men

A follow-up study to assess the effects of personally tailored diabetes care in general practice has revealed that such care reduces mortality (both all-cause and diabetes-related), in women, but not men. The study is by Dr. Marlene Krag, The Research Unit for General Practice, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues, and is published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

Lees verder


Recommended activity levels not achieved by obese children and those with liver disease

In a new study published today in the journal Nutrients, research from the University of Surrey and the Children's Liver Disease Foundation has found that both obese children and those with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are not meeting the UK recommendations for a variety of vitamins and minerals.

Lees verder


Recent Western blood pressure guidelines may boost stroke risk in Asian patients

European and North American blood pressure guidelines, issued last year, may actually boost the stroke risk if used for Asian patients, particularly the elderly, suggests an expert opinion published online in the journal Heart Asia.

Lees verder


A 'bottom up' approach to managing climate change

In advance of next week's United Nations climate meeting in Paris, Allen Fawcett et al. highlight the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions, in which various countries have put forward their commitments toward emissions reductions.

Lees verder


Researchers uncover essential interaction between malaria parasites and liver cells

Scientists at the Center for Infectious Disease Research recently uncovered a critical piece in the puzzle of how malaria parasites infect their host. The work, recently published in Science Magazine, reveals the details of how the malaria parasite invades its initial target organ, the liver. Without infection of the liver, the parasites cannot multiply or spread to the blood. Infection of the blood causes illness, spread of the disease, and, ultimately, death.

Lees verder


Osteoarthritis finding sheds new light on HA injection controversy

A discovery by Cornell University bioengineers is shedding new light on the controversy surrounding a common treatment for osteoarthritis that has divided the medical community over its effectiveness.

Lees verder


Global growth in CO2 emissions stagnates

After a decade of rapid growth in global CO2 emissions, which increased at an average annual rate of 4 percent, much smaller increases were registered in 2012 (0.8 percent), 2013 (1.5 percent) and 2014 (0.5 percent). In 2014, when the emissions growth was almost at a standstill, the world's economy continued to grow by 3 percent. The trend over the last three years thus sends an encouraging signal on the decoupling of CO2 emissions from global economic growth.

Lees verder


EUROPAEM EMF Guideline 2015 for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of EMF-related health problems and illnesses.

Chronic diseases and illnesses associated with unspecific symptoms are on the rise. In addition to chronic stress in social and work environments, physical and chemical exposures at home, at work, and during leisure activities are causal or contributing environmental stressors that deserve attention by the general practitioner as well as by all other members of the health care community.

Lees verder


Reliable disease biomarkers characterizing and identifying electrohypersensitivity and multiple chemical sensitivity as two etiopathogenic aspects of a unique pathological disorder.

Much of the controversy over the causes of electro-hypersensitivity (EHS) and multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) lies in the absence of both recognized clinical criteria and objective biomarkers for widely accepted diagnosis. Since 2009, we have prospectively investigated, clinically and biologically, 1216 consecutive EHS and/or MCS-self reporting cases, in an attempt to answer both questions. We report here our preliminary data, based on 727 evaluable of 839 enrolled cases: 521 (71.6%) were diagnosed with EHS, 52 (7.2%) with MCS, and 154 (21.2%) with both EHS and MCS. Two out of three patients with EHS and/or MCS were female; mean age (years) was 47. As inflammation appears to be a key process resulting from electromagnetic field (EMF) and/or chemical effects on tissues, and histamine release is potentially a major mediator of inflammation, we systematically measured histamine in the blood of patients. Near 40% had a increase in histaminemia (especially when both conditions were present), indicating a chronic inflammatory response can be detected in these patients. Oxidative stress is part of inflammation and is a key contributor to damage and response. Nitrotyrosin, a marker of both peroxynitrite (ONOO°-) production and opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), was increased in 28% the cases. Protein S100B, another marker of BBB opening was increased in 15%. Circulating autoantibodies against O-myelin were detected in 23%, indicating EHS and MCS may be associated with autoimmune response. Confirming animal experiments showing the increase of Hsp27 and/or Hsp70 chaperone proteins under the influence of EMF, we found increased Hsp27 and/or Hsp70 in 33% of the patients. As most patients reported chronic insomnia and fatigue, we determined the 24 h urine 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate (6-OHMS)/creatinin ratio and found it was decreased (<0.8) in all investigated cases. Finally, considering the self-reported symptoms of EHS and MCS, we serially measured the brain blood flow (BBF) in the temporal lobes of each case with pulsed cerebral ultrasound computed tomosphygmography. Both disorders were associated with hypoperfusion in the capsulothalamic area, suggesting that the inflammatory process involve the limbic system and the thalamus. Our data strongly suggest that EHS and MCS can be objectively characterized and routinely diagnosed by commercially available simple tests. Both disorders appear to involve inflammation-related hyper-histaminemia, oxidative stress, autoimmune response, capsulothalamic hypoperfusion and BBB opening, and a deficit in melatonin metabolic availability; suggesting a risk of chronic neurodegenerative disease. Finally the common co-occurrence of EHS and MCS strongly suggests a common pathological mechanism.

Lees verder


People Tied Up ‘Like Animals’ on UK Deportation Flights

Commercial contractors routinely belt immigration detainees into restraints so extreme that they are rarely used in prisons.

Lees verder


Putting Too Much Pressure on Children to Achieve at School Can Push Their Grades Down

Encouraging your childs academic achievement requires a careful balancing act.

Lees verder


Lobbyists, in Strategy Session, Conclude That Refugee Crisis “Helps Us” Defeat Regulations

In an audio recording of a strategy session obtained by The Intercept, major trade association lobbyists discussed how the refugee crisis has changed the political dynamics in Washington to their advantage. In the conference call held last week, lobbyists representing a number of high-polluting industries agreed that the battle between Congress and President Obama on refugee policy will give them the cover they need to attach a legislative rider to the omnibus budget bill that rolls back newly expanded clean water regulation.

Lees verder


Why anti-vaxxers aren't the biggest threat to immunization

The Liberal government has promised a national strategy to increase vaccination rates, but one journalist argues there are bigger barriers to Canada's immunization system than the people opposed to vaccines.

Lees verder


Screen time seems positive for children in small doses, depression study suggests

Youngsters who spend too much time staring at televisions and computers may be more depressed than those who abstain completely, but kids who enjoy screen time in moderation may be the happiest of all, a recent analysis suggests.

Lees verder


Quebec cracks down on e-cigarettes, bans patio smoking

The Quebec government has passed a bill restricting the use of electronic cigarettes and banning smoking on restaurant and bar patios.

Lees verder


Why seed banks aren't the only answer to food security

Hopes are being pinned on backup vaults to rescue the seeds we’re losing, but some simple changes in our diets can make a difference too.

Lees verder


Destruction of Brazil's Amazon forest jumps 16 percent in 2015.

The destruction of Brazil's Amazon forest, the world's largest intact rainforest, increased by 16 percent in 2015 from a year ago as the government struggles to enforce legislation and stop illegal clearings.

Lees verder


New edits to animal genes cut down on rough drafts, but not on worries.

With the federal government’s approval last week of a fast-growing salmon as the first genetically altered animal Americans can eat, a menagerie of gene-edited animals is already being raised on farms and in laboratories.

Lees verder


Ohio weighing ban on plastic microbeads.

A bill recently introduced in the Ohio House of Representatives would ban the sale and manufacture of products containing tiny plastic particles known as microbeads, a likely companion to legislation introduced earlier this year in the Ohio Senate.

Lees verder


Bhopal residents demonstrate demanding clean drinking water.

Hundreds of residents of the communities next to the abandoned Union Carbide factory in Bhopal on Thursday demonstrated at the JLN Hospital demanding free medical treatment, clean drinking water and exemption from paying water bills.

Lees verder


Big Tobacco tries to put its stamp on new packaging.

Cigarette lobbyists take aim at a Swiss company over high-tech anti-counterfeit technology.

Lees verder


Prostate cancer patients should avoid eating too much saturated fat

Oncologists might tell their prostate cancer patients that they can eat whatever they would like to eat.

Lees verder


GM soy produces less than non-GMO – university study

Brazilian research exposes more broken promises of the GMO industry.

Lees verder


Séralini’s team and CRIIGEN win two court cases about their research on toxicity of GMOs and pesticides

Pro-GMO lobbyists indicted for forgery and defamation.

Lees verder


BBC reporter advises industry on how to gain public acceptance for GM

Tom Heap and the BBC stand condemned for lack of objectivity and distance when it comes to GM – Claire Robinson reports.

Lees verder


Sitting further away from your boss makes you a better worker, study suggests

Physical distance determines how the bad behaviour of managers spreads to employees, research shows

Lees verder


Energy drinks run out of fizz as scientists discover spoonful of sugar in water has same effect

Scientists at the University of Bath have discovered adding a spoonful of sugar to water can increase performance

Lees verder


Dogs proven to engage in moral evaluation of people and animals by observing their behavior

(NaturalNews) A Yale study is shining new light on the complexity of the canine mind. In more ways than one, man's best friend is trying to communicate with his master. Dogs not only observe human behavior but seem to engage in a moral evaluation of the people nearest them.Yale...

Lees verder


Free market develops solution to unskilled fast food workers demanding exorbitant wages

(NaturalNews) The controversial debate over what low-skilled workers in the fast food industry and others should be earning was never really going to be decided by socialist, Left-wing academics, union chiefs and politicians egging on recent wage-hike protests and movements like ...

Lees verder


Mainstream media corporations opening labs to study how TV programming can manipulate human thinking

(NaturalNews) America's legacy media companies – which have been hemorrhaging viewers and readers for years, not to mention revenue – have decided that, since they can't compete with the new alternative media with a superior product or win the ideological debates, they...

Lees verder


Keeping people malnourished and hungry boosts corporate profits, study finds

(NaturalNews) It would not be a good idea to shop at a department store on an empty belly. The hungrier a person is, the more willing they are to buy not only food, but also clothes, toys, tools -- any kind of nonfood item. According to new findings from the University of Minnesota's...

Lees verder


The biggest lie about natural remedies exposed

(NaturalNews) A small voice inside your head may be telling you that natural remedies are not effective for your current health crisis. And, that's understandable, when you consider the amount of people that believe pharmaceutical drugs are the 'only way' to treat chronic health problems...

Lees verder


The Oil Alarm - New film by Liam Scheff exposes the coming global collapse precipitated by oil dependence - and what you can do to prepare

(NaturalNews) The world has been dependent upon fossil fuel oil for more than a century, and while many economists credit it with helping usher in the Industrial Revolution that turned America into the world's No. 1 economy while lifting other nations out of poverty...

Lees verder


How your psychic senses are connected to Earth's energy

(NaturalNews) Psychic researcher Pete A. Sanders Jr. knew early on that psych ability was real, leading him to spend his education at MIT studying brain science and biomedical chemistry, hoping to understand the complex relationship between the brain, the mind and the nervous system...

Lees verder


Jimmy Carter - The U.S. is an 'oligarchy with unlimited political bribery'

(NaturalNews) Former president Jimmy Carter said Tuesday on the nationally syndicated radio show the Thom Hartmann Program[1] that the United States is now an "oligarchy" in which "unlimited political bribery" has created "a complete subversion of our political system as...

Lees verder


Rapid Plankton Growth in Ocean Seen as Sign of Carbon Dioxide Loading

A microscopic marine alga is thriving in the North Atlantic to an extent that defies scientific predictions, suggesting swift environmental change as a result of increased carbon dioxide in the ocean.

Lees verder


Mixed drinks with diet beverages may boost breath alcohol levels

(Reuters Health) - People who mix alcohol and diet drinks end up with more alcohol on their breath, according to a new study.

Lees verder


Skunk 'causes damage to vital nerve fibres'

Skunk has been shown to damage the corpus callosum, the structure that allows communication between the brain's left and right hemispheres

Lees verder


What the ‘Monsanto Law’ in South America has Done to Farmers’ Rights

If you want to know how Monsanto gets trade agreements in foreign countries without a truly democratic or legal process, you can look no further than South America for answers. Using antiquated laws and the North American Free Trade Agreements…

Lees verder


Turn Your Organic Waste Into Energy for Your Home

Check out this affordable and compact anaerobic digester that converts organic waste into...

Lees verder


Use of banned pesticide not isolated event in US territories

Nine months after a vacationing family nearly died from exposure to methyl bromide on the island of St. John, authorities have come to at least one troubling conclusion: The use of the banned pesticide was not an isolated event in U.S. Caribbean territories.

Lees verder


Neurons in crows' brains signal which pictures belong together

During learning, cells in the crow brain acquire discharge patterns that associate pictures with their meaning.

Lees verder


New Report Says Child Brides In Africa Could More Than Double By 2050

UNICEF is warning that the number of underage girls marrying in Africa could increase 250 percent to 310 million over the next 35 years.

Lees verder


Dachel Media Update - Doctors Divided on Meningitis B Vaccine

experts said the decision-making is complicated because a child’s chance of suffering this bacterial infection is infinitesimal while the efficacy and safety track record for both approved versions of the vaccine is limited.

Lees verder


New Technique Enables Long-Term Brain Imaging In Primates

Researchers have developed a system to reversibly light up selected neurons in the brains of marmosets over several months.

Lees verder


How Probiotics May Save Us from Superbugs

We’ve been engaging in a warfare of sorts lately, against bacteria that are quickly learning to outsmart our weapons of choice—antibiotics. Consider that more than 70 percent of all bacterial infections in hospitals are resistant to at least one of the antibiotics used to treat them, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). But […]

Lees verder


Red Wine Headache? It’s Probably Not Sulfites…

Red wine — it’s loaded with health benefits. From heart health to anti-aging properties, there are plenty of good reasons to add a glass of red wine into your diet. But for some of us, drinking red wine isn’t the pleasant, health-improving experience it’s supposed to be. One glass can turn into a nearly instant hangover-style […]

Lees verder


Fibromyalgia And Diet - A Beginner’s Guide To Natural Treatment

Do you experience long-term muscle tenderness or joint pain that affects your everyday life? Are you worried it will only get worse? Fibromyalgia is an unusual medical condition thought to affect up to 6 percent of the population, particularly middle-aged women (1). While it cannot be completely cured, it can be treated… and what you eat appears to be a fundamental […]

Lees verder


DIY Pumpkin Spice Latte Recipe (GMO-Free!)

Fall is coming, and for a lot of us that means delicious fall flavors, like cinnamon, cloves, ginger, and pumpkin. But wait! That innocent-looking pumpkin spice latte might just be hiding GMOs.

Lees verder


Think sugar-free drinks are better for your teeth? Think AGAIN!

Dentists at the University of Melborne warned acidic additives and those with low pH cause 'measurable damage' to the teeth, causing dental erosion where acid dissolves the hard tissues of the teeth.

Lees verder


Regularly smoking cannabis found to damage area of brain that carries signals

Researchers at King's College London found that people who regularly took strong ‘skunk’ cannabis had signs of greater damage to the biggest ‘tract’ of white matter.

Lees verder


Malnutrition – Surely Not in My Country?

You may have thought that malnutrition is just something that’s happening to people who live in poverty-stricken third world countries. Malnutrition is here in the most advanced Western nations and afflicts youngsters all the way up to seniors. It even affects people living in long-term care facilities where you would expect they would be carefully and scientifically nutritionally cared for.

Lees verder


Your Heart Needs Help

My sister’s husband died some months ago, so Barbara has been going through a traumatic period and has now started the process of selling their home. It is not surprising that just before arriving here, on a planned visit to her doctor, her blood pressure was tested at over 200.

Lees verder


China ‘cloning factory’ to produce cattle, racehorses and pets

World’s largest cloning facility in China aims to produce a million cattle a year, along with other animals.

Lees verder


Vitamin D deficiency and dyslipidemia in early pregnancy

The positive correlations between serum vitamin D and the atherogenic factors such as total cholesterol and triglycerides indicate a pro-atherogenic metabolic status in vitamin D deficient expectant mothers. This may represent an adaptation to the high metabolic demands of pregnancy.

Lees verder


The mechanisms associated with the development of hypertension after exposure to lead, mercury

Based on our results, the prominent mechanism of action associated with the development of hypertension seems to be oxidative stress and kidney damage for lead, while increased RAS activation links methylmercury to hypertension, but these mechanisms along with hypertension disappear when metals are present in some mixtures.

Lees verder


Serum vitamin B12 is Inversely Associated with Periodontal Progression and Risk of Tooth Loss

To investigate the association of serum vitamin B12 with the progression of periodontitis and risk of tooth loss in a prospective cohort study.

Lees verder


Inhibition of ATP synthesis by fenbufen and its conjugated metabolites in rat liver mitochondria

The results from the present experiments provide evidence that fenbufen and its metabolites could be involved in mitochondrial toxicity through inhibition of ATP synthesis.

Lees verder


Higher visceral fat area increases the risk of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency in Chinese adults

These results suggest that higher VFA increases the risk of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency in men and pre-menopausal women, but not in post-menopausal women. VFA is a better and convenience surrogate marker for visceral adipose measurement and could be used in identifying the risk of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency in routine health examination.

Lees verder


Associations of vitamin D status and vitamin D-related polymorphisms with sex hormones in older men

Vitamin D status is positively associated with testosterone levels. No association was found between vitamin D-related gene polymorphisms and hormone levels.

Lees verder


The Effects of Chromium Supplementation on Endocrine Profiles, Biomarkers of Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Overall, taking chromium for 8 weeks among women with PCOS had beneficial effects on acne, hirsutism, hs-CRP, TAC, and MDA levels, but it did not affect endocrine profiles, NO, and GSH.

Lees verder


Changes in Liver Antioxidant Status of Offspring Mice Induced by Maternal Fluoride Exposure During Gestation and Lactation

Excessive fluoride intake for a long time has been demonstrated to provoke hepatic oxidative stress in adults. However, the response to fluoride toxicity of liver in newborns exposed to fluoride during embryonic and suckling stages remains unclear.

Lees verder


Traditional Chinese medical herbs staged therapy in infertile women with endometriosis

Compared with hormone therapy, traditional Chinese medical herb's two-staged therapy is effective and safe for endometriosis patients with infertility.

Lees verder


The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using Chinese Medicinal Plants

TCM, as a multi-component and multi-target approach, which is a perfect match with the holistic concept of systems biology, is applicable in the treatment of RA. The synergistic connections of Chinese herbs and mechanisms of related active compounds on RA increase the trust for TCM. TCM as alternative remedies for RA not only has an important position in the world market, but also has an irreplaceable role in the treatment of RA in future.

Lees verder


Chinese Herbal Bath Therapy for the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis

Chinese herbal bath therapy may be a safe, effective, and simple alternative treatment modality for knee OA. Further rigorously designed, randomized trials are warranted.

Lees verder


Sunflower Seed and Acne Vulgaris

Sunflower seed intake appears to aggravate acne vulgaris; however, further evidence is needed to ban sunflower seed intake in patients with acne. Considering the observed potential negative effect in this trial, future randomized clinical trials may base their design on randomly assigning the exposed patients to give up use of sunflower seed intake.

Lees verder


Residential Road Traffic Noise and High Depressive Symptoms after Five Years of Follow-up

Our results suggest that residential road traffic noise exposure increases the risk of depressive symptoms.

Lees verder


Cholesterol gallstone disease

With a prevalence of 10–15% in adults in Europe and the USA, gallstones are the most common digestive disease needing admission to hospital in the West. The interplay between interprandial and postprandial physiological responses to endogenous and dietary lipids underscores the importance of coordinated hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal functions to prevent crystallisation and precipitation of excess biliary cholesterol.

Lees verder


Vitamin D deficiency in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - The chicken or the egg?

Weight loss per increased serum vitamin D level without vitamin D supplementation and improved metabolic parameters in NAFLD.

Lees verder


Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals

This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity.

Lees verder


The association of vitamin D deficiency with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

In this study, we found lower serum 25(OH)D levels in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease than in subjects without non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. To establish causality between vitamin D and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, further interventional studies with a long-term follow-up are needed.

Lees verder


Does Vitamin C Deficiency Promote Fatty Liver Disease Development?

This review discusses the currently available data from human surveys and experimental models in search of a putative role of VitC deficiency in the development of NAFLD and NASH.

Lees verder


Genistein, the Isoflavone in Soybean, Causes Amyloid Beta Peptide Accumulation in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Line: Implications in Alzheimer's Disease

The results do not support the view that genistein could be a putative drug against AD and instead strengthen the epidemiological study which implies that genistein content of soybean food product (Tofu) leads to cognitive impairment.

Lees verder


Association Between Atopic Disease and Anemia in US Children

The association between atopic disease and anemia was reproducible in multiple cohorts. Future studies are needed to identify the determinants of association between atopic disease and anemia.

Lees verder


Dietary intake polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and associated cancer risk in a cohort of Chinese urban adults

The study indicates that measuring actually consumed foods is more appropriate for dietary intake exposure assessment, and intra-individual variance should be taken into account during study design and data analysis.

Lees verder


Legume seeds and colorectal cancer revisited

Results reveal legume protein MMPIs as novel metalloproteinase inhibitors with possible pharmacological interest. This may be important for selecting leguminous species with potential use in anti-cancer diets.

Lees verder


Sickness behavior is accentuated in rats with metabolic disorders induced by a fructose diet

In this study, fructose diets played an important role in both the induction of metabolic disorders and the modulation of sickness behaviors in response to an immunological challenge, most likely through the induction of cytokines in the hypothalamus.

Lees verder


The gut microbiome, diet, and links to cardiometabolic and chronic disorders

This Review summarizes data suggesting a link between the gut microbiota and derived metabolites with food intake patterns, metabolic alterations, and chronic CMDs.

Lees verder


PDF - The gut microbiome in cardio-metabolic health

With the prevalence of cardio-metabolic disorders reaching pandemic proportions, the search for modifiable causative factors has intensified. One such potential factor is the vast microbial community inhabiting the human gastrointestinal tract, the gut microbiota. For the past decade evidence has accumulated showing the association of distinct changes in gut microbiota composition and function with obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Lees verder


Acute effects of a wild green-oat (Avena sativa) extract on cognitive function in middle-aged adults

These results confirm the acute cognitive effects of GOE seen in previous research, and suggest that the optimal dose lies at or below 800 mg.

Lees verder


Ultraviolet light exposure, skin cancer risk and vitamin D production

The danger of overexposure to solar ultraviolet radiation has been widely reviewed since the 1980s due to the depletion of the ozone layer. However, the benefits of mild exposure of the skin to ultraviolet (UV) light have not been widely investigated.

Lees verder


The Relationship between Maternal Vitamin D Deficiency and Low Birth Weight Neonates

Maternal Vitamin D deficiency may increase the risk of low birth weight neonate and modifying maternal nutrition behavior and their vit D level could be beneficial on pregnancy outcome.

Lees verder


Renoprotective effects of berberine as adjuvant therapy for hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

The present results suggest that berberine is beneficial for hypertensive patients with T2DM as add-on therapy to standard hypotensive and hypoglycemic agents.

Lees verder


Electroacupuncture at the governor vessel and bladder meridian acupoints improves postmenopausal osteoporosis

these results demonstrated that long-term stimulation with EA treatment at the GV and BL acupoints was able to alleviate osteoporosis induced by an ovariectomy through regulating the OPG/RANKL and Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathways.

Lees verder


Effects of Ramadan Fasting on Glucose Homeostasis, Lipid Profiles, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Kashan, Iran

In conclusion, Ramadan fasting in women with PCOS for 4 weeks had beneficial effects on NO and GSH levels, but did not affect glucose hemostasis parameters, lipid profiles or TAC.

Lees verder


Effects of 12-month, 2000IU/day vitamin D supplementation on treatment naïve and vitamin D deficient Saudi type 2 diabetic patients

Twelve-month vitamin D supplementation of 2000IU per day in a cohort of treatment naïve Saudi patients with T2DM resulted in improvement of several cardiometabolic parameters including systolic blood pressure, insulin, and HOMA-IR. Further studies that include a placebo group are suggested to reinforce findings.

Lees verder


Early-stage lupus nephritis treated with N-acetylcysteine

In conclusion, the present report of two cases has shown that NAC, as an antioxidant, may exert a beneficial effect to modulate the oxidative status in LN; however, the underlying mechanisms require further investigation.

Lees verder


Early-stage lupus nephritis treated with N-acetylcysteine

These results suggest that the diseases related to pain and psychological disorders are the main fields of CAM use. It also shows the increasing trend of the use of CAM at an academic medical center in the US.

Lees verder


Kefir and Cancer - A Systematic Review of Literatures

The results of this systematic review suggest that kefir may be associated with cancer prevention and it also has beneficial effects in cancer treatment. This protection may be associated with kefir bioactive components including peptides, polysaccharides and sphingolipids.

Lees verder


Eight-day consumption of inulin added to a yogurt breakfast lowers postprandial appetite ratings but not energy intakes in young healthy females

Therefore, the addition of 6 g inulin to a commercially available yogurt affected feelings of appetite, but not energy intake, after repeated consumption. These results suggest that inulin may be a suitable ingredient to increase dietary fibre consumption, with potential to impact appetite.

Lees verder


Research suggests that the agricultural revolution is responsible for the evolution of skin pigmentation

Researchers recently analyzed DNA changes in Ancient Europe. From this analysis, they created the hypothesis that the shift to agriculture is responsible for lighter skin pigmentation. The researchers supported this hypothesis by stating that the change in diet led to a decreased vitamin D intake.

Lees verder


Why is daily dosing of vitamin D important?

Occasionally, I miss very important vitamin D papers. Professors Bruce Hollis and Carol Wagner published such a paper in late 2013.

Lees verder


Vitamin D may help protect the brain in MS patients

A recent study discovered that vitamin D status is positively associated with gray matter volume in patients with multiple sclerosis.

Lees verder


Africa’s Indigenous Fruit Trees - A Blessing in Decline

The indigenous fruit trees of sub-Saharan Africa have long provided essential nutrients and other ecosystem services, from soil stability to carbon sequestration. Today, as the trees’ natural habitats are lost, questions arise over where they will grow in the future and whether they will continue to provide the same wide range of benefits.

Lees verder


Evidence for Obesogenicity of a BPA Metabolite

“This is an interesting paper that demonstrates a possible in vivo function for BPA-glucuronide which has heretofore been viewed as an inactive metabolite,” says Bruce Blumberg, a biology professor at the University of California, Irvine, who was not involved with the study. “If these authors are correct, then the argument that BPA is immediately rendered inactive by conjugation to BPA-glucuronide after ingestion, making it harmless, is inaccurate and misleading.”

Lees verder


Identifying Potential Breast Carcinogens

In this issue of EHP, a team of researchers apply that recommendation in a novel framework in which they work backward from a specific health outcome—in this case, breast cancer—through the biological mechanisms associated with it to identify appropriate assays for disease-specific chemical risk assessment.

Lees verder


Screening for Chemical Contributions to Breast Cancer Risk

This approach could inform the development of toxicity testing that targets mechanisms relevant to breast cancer, providing a basis for identifying safer chemicals. The study identified important end points not currently evaluated by federal testing programs, including altered mammary gland development, Her2 activation, progesterone receptor activity, prolactin effects, and aspects of estrogen receptor ? activity. This approach could be extended to identify the biological processes and screening methods relevant for other common diseases.

Lees verder


Prospective Study of Ambient Particulate Matter Exposure and Risk of Pulmonary Embolism in the Nurses’ Health Study Cohort

We provide evidence that PM in the prior 1 and 12 months is associated with PE risk. Our results also suggest that women with underlying health conditions may be more susceptible to PE after PM exposure.

Lees verder


Effects of Low-Dose Bisphenol A on DNA Damage and Proliferation of Breast Cells

Low-dose BPA exerted c-Myc–dependent genotoxic and mitogenic effects on ER?-negative mammary cells. These findings provide significant evidence of adverse effects of low-dose BPA on mammary cells.

Lees verder


Folic Acid and Creatine as Therapeutic Approaches to Lower Blood Arsenic

In this mixed folate-deficient/replete study population, 12- and 24-week treatment with 800 ?g (but not 400 ?g) FA lowered bAs to a greater extent than placebo; this was sustained 12 weeks after FA cessation. In future studies, we will evaluate whether FA and/or creatine altered As methylation profiles.

Lees verder


Acrolein Exposure in U.S. Tobacco Smokers and Non-Tobacco Users

Tobacco smoke was a significant predictor of acrolein exposure in the U.S. population.

Lees verder


Associations of Perfluoroalkyl Substances (PFASs) with Lower Birth Weight

Results of our simulations suggest that a substantial proportion of the association between prenatal PFAS and birth weight may be attributable to confounding by GFR and that confounding by GFR may be more important in studies with sample collection later in pregnancy.

Lees verder


Reducing Periconceptional Methylmercury Exposure

Our findings suggest that the proposed periconceptional blood mercury screening program for women planning a pregnancy would be highly cost-effective from a societal perspective. The results of a value of information analysis confirm the robustness of the study’s conclusions.

Lees verder


What do we understand from clinical and mechanistic studies on acupuncture treatment for hypertension?

The outcome of acupuncture on hypertension treatment is inconclusive. This study aims to evaluate the influence of acupuncture on hypertension, based on findings from mechanistic studies over the course of decades particularly those conducted at the University of California, Irvine.

Lees verder


Mitochondrial toxicity of diclofenac and its metabolites via inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation (ATP synthesis) in rat liver mitochondria

Our data from this study strongly indicate that Dic as well as its metabolites could be involved in the hepato-toxic action through inhibition of ATP synthesis.

Lees verder


Ginseng alleviates cyclophosphamide-induced hepatotoxicity

Cyclophosphamide (CP), a chemotherapeutic agent, is restricted due to its side effects, especially hepatotoxicity. Ginseng has often been clinically used with CP in China, but whether and how ginseng reduces the hepatotoxicity is unknown.

Lees verder


Ghrelin in the pilosebaceous unit - alteration of ghrelin in patients with acne vulgaris

Ghrelin produced in hair follicles and sebaceous glands of the skin might participate in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris and also acne vulgaris in humans might be associated with decreased serum ghrelin.

Lees verder


A meta-analysis of the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and obesity

The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was associated with obesity in Asians and European-American, OR (95% CI) were 3.70 (1.98-6.90) and 3.09 (1.89-5.04), respectively. No publication bias was found in our study. vitamin D deficiency may be associated with obesity, irrespective of areas.

Lees verder


Aerotoxic

The aircraft cabin air tests offered on this site are intended to provide insight into whether a person was exposed to particular neurotoxic constituents of engine oil smoke/fumes on an aircraft (commercial or military). Options include an air sampler card and air pump/filter equipment, as well as a post-incident garment analysis. The blood tests offered on this site may provide insight into whether a person is especially susceptible to the effects of certain neurotoxic constituents of the engine oil fumes (DNA PON1 test), and whether there is objective evidence of damage to the central nervous system (glial autoantibody test).

Lees verder


Putin wants Russia to become world's biggest exporter of Non-GMO food

Russia could become the world's largest supplier of ecologically clean and high-quality organic food, said President Vladimir Putin on Thursday. He also called on the country to become completely self-sufficient in food production by 2020.

Lees verder


Potential Role of Polyphenols in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. It is widely accepted that oxidative stress plays a key role in their development and progression; hence oxidative damage might be abrogated by antioxidants. Polyphenols are phytochemicals showing extensively studied antioxidant properties in-vivo.

Lees verder


Possible Therapeutic Effect of Stem Cell in Atherosclerosis in Albino Rats

A definite therapeutic effect of mesenchymal stem cells was found on atherosclerosis.

Lees verder


Auricular acupuncture and biomedical research-A promising Sino-Austrian research cooperation

Treatment by auricular acupuncture has a long history. Ear-acupoint research has been advancing step by step in China and also in Europe. Auricles are rich in nerves, therefore a close relationship with different functions of the human body has been proved by the research teams of the two main authors of this article from China and Austria. In recent years, great progress has been made in the research of regulating human body functions through electroacupuncture at the auricular branch of the vagus nerve, which is part of auricular acupuncture therapy. It is well known that the auricular branch of the vagus nerve is the only peripheral pathway to the cerebral cortex. Studies of the Chinese team on hypertension, diabetes, epilepsy and depression have shown that the mechanism of auricular vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may be comparable with cervical VNS in terms of pathways. Auricular VNS has a broad clinical application prospect.

Lees verder


Anti-Diabetic Effects of Madecassic Acid and Rotundic Acid

Anti-diabetic effects of madecassic acid (MEA) and rotundic acid (RA) were examined. MEA or RA at 0.05% or 0.1% was supplied to diabetic mice for six weeks. The intake of MEA, not RA, dose-dependently lowered plasma glucose level and increased plasma insulin level. MEA, not RA, intake dose-dependently reduced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and fibrinogen level; as well as restored antithrombin-III and protein C activities in plasma of diabetic mice.

Lees verder


A combination of low serum concentrations of vitamins K1 and D is associated with increased risk of hip fractures in elderly Norwegians

Combination of low concentrations of vitamin K1 and 25(OH)D is associated with increased risk of hip fractures.

Lees verder


Steun ons werk, bezoek eens onze webwinkel


[ Terug naar het hoofdmenu ]

 

 


View My Stats