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Internationaal nieuws 11 april 2012


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10 Things the Food Industry Doesn’t Want You to Know

Bigger, juicier, saltier, sweeter, crunchier. Most of all, more. The food industry and its nonstop marketing has been tabbed by many experts as a major player in the obesity epidemic. “The result of constant exposure to today’s ‘eat more’ food environment,” write Marion Nestle and Malden Nesheim in their upcoming book Why Calories Count, “has been to drive people to desire high-calorie foods and to become ‘conditioned overeaters.’”

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62 percent of men and 37 percent of women over the age of 65 are sexually active

A study based on the National Health and Sexuality Survey, involving nearly 2,000 people, describes the sexual practices of senior citizens in Spain. The most common are kisses, caresses and vaginal penetration. The main causes of sexual inactivity are physical illness and widowerhood.

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99% of Breast Cancer Patients Have Parabens in Their Body

New research has detected the presence of paraben esters in 99 percent of breast cancer tissues sampled.

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A new gene thought to be the cause in early-onset forms of Alzheimer's disease

A new gene that causes early onset of Alzheimer's disease has been discovered by the research team of Dominique Campion at the Insert unit 1079 "Genetics of cancer and neuropsychiatric diseases" in Rouen. The research scientists showed that in the families of five of 14 patients suffering from the disease, mutations were detected on the gene SORL1. The results of this study have been published in the review Molecular Psychiatry issued April 3.

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A study confirms that long commercials evoke stronger emotions

Through a psycho-physiological study developed jointly by El Bureau de la Comunicacion, the Tecnalia Centre for Applied Research, and the UPV/EHU, it has been possible to measure the emotional response of a person to a series of television adverts.

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Activity in brain networks related to features of depression

Depressed individuals with a tendency to ruminate on negative thoughts, i.e. to repeatedly think about particular negative thoughts or memories, show different patterns of brain network activation compared to healthy individuals, report scientists of a new study in Biological Psychiatry.

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An Alcohol and Breast Cancer Connection - Video

Dr. James Meschino explains how alcohol may be a cause of cancer and how exactly that might happen. Dr. Meschino also talks about how breast cancer is associated with alcohol consumption.

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Antibody therapy prevents gastrointestinal damage following radiation exposure in mice

A new study offers the first evidence of a drug capable of preventing lethal damage to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract caused by exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation, such as those occurring during a nuclear incident. There are currently no FDA-approved treatments or prophylactics available to manage the condition, known as radiation gastrointestinal syndrome (RGS), which is associated with weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration, systemic infection, and -- in extreme cases -- septic shock and death.

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Are we really a nation of animal lovers?

A new study by the University of Bristol has estimated that over 260,000 cats and dogs entered the care of UK rescue organizations during 2009, the first full year since the onset of the UK recession.

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Arsenic turns stem cells cancerous, spurring tumor growth

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered how exposure to arsenic can turn normal stem cells into cancer stem cells and spur tumor growth.

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Autism and Disappearing Bees: A Common Denominator?

A few days ago the Salt Lake Tribune's front page headline declared, "Highest rate in the nation, 1 in 32 Utah boys has autism." This is a national public health emergency, whose epicenter is Utah, Gov. Herbert. A more obscure story on the same day read: "New pesticides linked to bee population collapse." If you eat food, and hope to do so in the future, this is another national emergency, Pres. Obama. A common denominator may underlie both headlines.

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Autism mutations, scattered across many genes, merge into common network of interactions

Among autistic children with no family history of ASD, researchers uncovered 49 gene mutations disrupting a pathway that modifies chromatin and regulates genes in the brain and nervous system. Various changes in this pathway contribute to children developing autism in different ways. Many different forms of autism exist at the molecular level, making ASD an umbrella disorder with many root causes. Conversely, many intellectual, social and mental disorders share common mutations. Divisions clinicians make among these disorders may not translate into molecular differences.

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Babies treated in the womb for obesity

Babies are being medicated in the womb in an attempt to prevent them from being born obese. In a world first, dangerously overweight mothers-to-be in four British cities have started taking a diabetes drug during their pregnancy.

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Beans, pulses and legumes have important role in nutrition

Beans, pulses and legumes can be classified as either vegetables or proteins under the new USDA dietary guidelines, giving them an important role in a person's daily diet, an expert panel said at the Institute of Food Technologists' Wellness 12 meeting.

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Behind The Orange Curtain

Behind the Orange Curtain is a documentary that will delve into the staggering problem of teenage Rx drug abuse in one of the most affluent counties in the country.

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Being ignored online or in person, it's still exclusion

People who are excluded by others online, such as on Facebook, may feel just as bad as if they had been excluded in person, according to researchers at Penn State and Misericordia University.

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Breast cancer screens leads to 'unnecessary treatment'

Up to one-in-four breast cancers detected by screening would never have gone on to be fatal or cause any symptoms, US researchers say. Their study based on 39,888 women in Norway said between 15% and 25% of breast cancers were "overdiagnosed".

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Caffeine and exercise may be protective against skin cancer caused by sun exposure

Caffeine and exercise decreased risk for sunlight-caused skin cancers in mice. Results suggest that fat and tumor growth are related. Findings link caffeine and exercise with lower levels of inflammation.

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Cancer stem cell proliferation mechanism identified in lab

A team of Japanese researchers has identified a molecular mechanism that helps cancer stem cells maintain their ability to proliferate in the human body.

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Changes in asthma treatment improve wait time and patient care in Emergency

Traditionally, for patients presenting with asthma arriving at the Emergency Department, the triage nursing staff would administer a relief medicine in a puffer or mask, to open the airways and ease breathing. Now, there is one more treatment option available on arrival in Emergency for children with moderate to severe asthma. This option empowers nurses to administer an oral steroid treatment.

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China Rejects Genetically Modified Rice

As awareness of genetically modified food and the dangers associated increase, actions are being taken to eliminate the issue entirely. With countries destroying their GMO crops, scientists showing the facts, and individuals voicing their discontent on the matter, there is a large and growing contingent across countries that are taking action to preserve the integrity of our food supply. China is the latest nation to take a stand against GMO crops.

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Chronic Stress Feeds Common Cold, Study Finds

Stress makes the common cold more miserable and harder to kick by letting inflammation linger, a new study found.

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Clothes Made with Synthetic Fabrics Are Polluting the Ocean

While synthetic fabrics are washed they shed bits of plastic that can end up in the oceans. Manufacturers are not required to test fabrics for their environmental impact. More than 65 percent of plastic in the ocean is in bits that are less than a millimeter thick.

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Community-onset Clostridium difficile linked to higher risk of surgery

Patients whose symptoms of Clostridium difficile infection start outside of the hospital setting have a higher risk of colectomy due to severe infection, according to a large multicenter study funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and published in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

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Consumers need simple, concise messages about benefits of phytonutrients

An expert panel at the Institute of Food Technologists' Wellness 12 meeting urged the food industry to find simple yet powerful language to tell consumers about the many benefits of a diet rich in phytonutrients.

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Cruciferous vegetable consumption linked to improved breast cancer survival rates

Intake is associated with decreased mortality and recurrence rates. Dose-response relationship was observed. Researchers recommend survivors eat more cruciferous vegetables.

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Dangerous Moment > Industry Plots to Keep Products Toxic

Cosmetics industry lobbyists are working non-stop to push this proposal that would make things worse, essentially enshrining into law decisions about ingredient safety made by the industry-funded Cosmetic Ingredient Review Panel — something that, according to FDA, would be “unprecedented†and possibly unconstitutional.

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Dentists 'should screen patients for alcohol abuse'

Dentists should screen patients for unhealthy drinking habits during routine appointments to help promote general health, experts have claimed.

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Dentists urged to check patient drinking habits

Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to cancer of the mouth, larynx and oesophagus and dentists may be the first to notice these conditions.

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Device to fight anaemia in India about to go on sale

Take anaemia for instance, more than half the cases can easily be cured with a course of free iron pills, but if left untreated it is potentially fatal, especially for pregnant women.

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DNA sequencing consortium unveils patterns of mutations in autism

An autism sequencing consortium led by researchers from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital, and six other organizations has searched for autism-related mutations in the fraction of the human genome that codes for proteins. The researchers sequenced this region, known as the "exome," in 175 autism patients and their unaffected parents. Their results suggest modest roles for hundreds of genes in the development of autism and pinpoint a few specific genes as genuine risk factors.

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Early-life exposure to BPA affects adult learning

This study is the first to identify a neurobehavioral effect of BPA using a zebrafish model exposed to concentrations comparable to what humans might encounter in the environment.

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Eating Cruciferous Vegetables May Improve Breast Cancer Survival

A study reveals that breast cancer survivors who eat more cruciferous vegetables may have improved survival.

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Eating flavonoids protects men against Parkinson's disease

Men who eat flavonoid-rich foods such as berries, tea, apples and red wine significantly reduce their risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to new research by Harvard University and the University of East Anglia.

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Enzyme in saliva helps regulate blood glucose

Scientists from the Monell Center report that blood glucose levels following starch ingestion are influenced by genetically-determined differences in salivary amylase, an oral enzyme that breaks down dietary starches. Specifically, higher salivary amylase activity is related to lower blood glucose. The findings suggest that salivary amylase may contribute significantly to overall metabolic status.

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FDA says fresh milk is dangerous, but chemical BPA is perfectly safe!

The FDA, the organization that conspired with California bureaucrats to attack raw milk distribution centers over the past two years, has just announced it will not ban BPA. The FDA says there isn't enough evidence of BPA being harmful to humans (that's a lie) and therefore it cannot be justifiably banned.

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Fearful Politicians Say Genetically Modified Labels Bill Could Land Vermont in Court

Vermont has passed progressive laws on the regulation of the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant, campaign contributions, and "data mining" by pharmaceutical companies that in recent years have been struck down by federal judges and the U.S. Supreme Court.

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Food science poised to help address needs of aging population

The aging baby boomers and subsequent generations will be looking to the food industry to provide products that can help them live longer, healthier and more active lives than previous generations, according to research presented at the Institute of Food Technologists' Wellness 12 meeting.

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Former tobacco VP admits destroying files

A former tobacco executive has admitted he helped to destroy research documents in the 1990s, when he was vice-president of legal affairs at Imperial Tobacco and a member of the firm's management committee.

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Genetic mutations at conception linked to many cases of autism

About 15 percent of autism cases in families with a single autistic child are associated with spontaneous mutations that occur in sex cells, Yale University researchers report in the April 4 issue of the journal Nature.

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German state finds dioxin in eggs, sees no danger

German authorities said on Wednesday the highly poisonous chemical dioxin had been discovered above permitted levels in eggs from a German farm but they see no danger to the public.

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Glycemic index foods at breakfast can control blood sugar throughout the day

Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar throughout the morning and after the next meal of the day, researchers said at the Institute of Food Technologists' Wellness 12 meeting.

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Greening up the blue dye in jeans, police uniforms and the red, white and blue

Efforts are underway to develop a more environmentally friendly process for dyeing denim with indigo, the storied "king of dyes," used to the tune of 50,000 tons annually to color cotton blue jeans and hundreds of other products. That effort is the topic of an article in the current edition of Chemical & Engineering News. C&EN is the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

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Growing nitrous oxide levels explained

Australian, Korean and US scientists have generated a 65-year record of Southern Hemisphere nitrous oxide measurements, establishing a new benchmark against which to compare changes in the long-lived greenhouse gas that is also a major ozone-depleting substance.

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How a cancer drug leads to diabetes

The drug known as rapamycin is widely used by cancer and transplant patients. But, it also comes with a downside: rapamycin leads to diabetes in as many as 15 percent of the people who take it. Now, researchers reporting in the April Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication, have figured out why that is. The drug turns the insulin signal off in muscle, to prevent muscle cells from taking blood sugar in.

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How fat are your lab mice?

Researchers are increasingly aware that fat in some parts of the body is more harmful than fat in other places. To help determine how obesity works, scientists turn to animal models and now, they are able to visualize how much fat their lab rats are carrying and where they are storing it. The method will be published in the April issue of the Journal of Visualized Experiments.

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Is bioenergy expansion harmful to wildlife?

Despite the predicted environmental benefits of biofuels, converting land to grow bioenergy crops may harm native wildlife. Researchers at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research in Leipzig have developed a way to study the effects of increased energy crop cultivation on farmland bird populations.

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Mammography harm 'underappreciated'

Mammography screening results in overdiagnosis of breast cancers that would have been harmless, say researchers who want women to be well informed.

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Mayo Clinic study identifies optimal gene targets for new colon cancer test

A study presented today by Mayo Clinic researchers at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2012 in Chicago identified two genes that are optimal targets to be analyzed in a new noninvasive test for colorectal cancer developed by Mayo Clinic, in collaboration with Exact Sciences Corporation.

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Memory declines faster in years closest to death

Two new studies published in the April 4 online issue of Neurology suggest that a person's memory declines at a faster rate in the last two-and-a-half years of life than at any other time. The second study shows that keeping mentally fit through activities may be the best way to preserve memory.

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Mutations in 3 genes linked to autism spectrum disorders

Mutations in three new genes have been linked to autism, according to new studies including one with investigators at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The findings, in a trio of papers revealing new genetic targets in autism, are published in the April 4th online issue of the journal Nature. The studies provide new insights into important genetic changes and the many biological pathways that lead to autism spectrum disorders.

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Nearly half of cancer survivors died from conditions other than cancer

Fifty-one percent of people who have had cancer died from cancer. Forty-nine percent of cancer survivors died from other conditions. Researchers encourage a more comprehensive approach to survivor health.

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Nearly half of preschool children not taken outside to play by parents on a daily basis: Study

A new study led by Pooja Tandon, M.D., M.P.H., of Seattle Children's Research Institute found that nearly half of preschoolers in a sample representing four million US children did not have even one parent-supervised outdoor play opportunity per day.

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Neuronal stem cells generated directy from skin cells

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine in Münster, Germany, have broken new ground by reprogramming skin cells from mice into neurons without regressing the cells through a pluripotent stage.

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New compound targets key mechanism behind lymphoma

Scientists at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia have come one step closer to developing the first treatment to target a key pathway in lymphoma. The new findings will be announced at the AACR Annual Meeting 2012 on Tuesday, April 3.

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New drug prevents spread of human prostate cancer cells

A new drug developed by Northwestern Medicine scientists prevented human prostate cancer cells from spreading to other tissues without any toxic effects. The drug turns off the "go" switch in the cancer cells and immobilizes them. Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in North American males. Death is mainly caused by metastasis, prostate cancer cells moving out of prostate tissue and spreading to other organs.

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New hormone for lowering blood sugar

New evidence points to a hormone that leaves muscles gobbling up sugar as if they can't get enough. That factor, which can be coaxed out of fat stem cells, could lead to a new treatment to lower blood sugar and improve metabolism, according to a report in the April issue of Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication.

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New immune defense enzyme discovered

Neutrophil granulocytes comprise important defenses for the immune system. When pathogenic bacteria penetrate the body, they are the first on the scene to mobilize other immune cells via signal molecules, thereby containing the risk. To this end, they release serine proteases -- enzymes that cut up other proteins to activate signal molecules. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried have now discovered a new serine protease: neutrophil serine protease 4, or NSP4. This enzyme could provide a new target for the treatment of diseases that involve an overactive immune system, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

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New method yields insulin-producing pancreatic cell clusters

Three-dimensional clusters of pancreatic beta-cells that live much longer and secrete more insulin than single cells grown in the laboratory are valuable new tools for studying pancreatic diseases such as diabetes and for testing novel therapies.

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Noninvasive stool test for colorectal cancer unaffected by variables

Patients did not have to adjust lifestyle or common drugs for this test. Age affected four methylation markers studied, but to different extents. Selecting optimal methylation markers may minimize false positives.

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Nutritional supplement works against some pancreatic cancer cells in mice

The dietary supplement gamma-linoleic acid can inhibit the growth of a subset of pancreatic cancer cells and selectively promote cancer cell death in mice, a Mayo Clinic study has found.

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Obese white women less likely to seek colon cancer screening

A new study by Johns Hopkins researchers shows that obese white women may be less likely than normal-weight counterparts and African-Americans of any weight or gender to seek potentially lifesaving colon cancer screening tests.

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Oceans heating up for over 100 years

In 1872 the HMS Challenger pulled out from Portsmouth, England to begin an unprecedented scientific expedition of the world's oceans. During its over three year journey the HMS Challenger not only collected thousands of new species and sounded unknown ocean depths,

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Oregano is a healing herb and natural anti-biotic

Oregano is a wonderful, aromatic herb that is native to the Mediterranean. It is thought to have originated in the mountainous regions of Greece, Turkey and Italy. It was named by the Ancient Greeks "Mountain Joy."

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Organic Food Industry Bought Up by Corporations Like Coca-Cola

You may be wondering why some supposedly ‘healthy’ and ‘environmentally conscious’ companies deceive unknowing consumers into purchasing products with hidden additives and fillers.

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Race may play role in presentation of triple-negative breast cancer in hispanic women

Disease prevalence is similar between Hispanics in Puerto Rico and California. Researchers suggest that biology of disease drives tumor behavior. Expression of estrogen receptor was associated with better prognosis.

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Red wine, fruit compound could help block fat cell formation

A compound found in red wine, grapes and other fruits, and similar in structure to resveratrol, is able to block cellular processes that allow fat cells to develop, opening a door to a potential method to control obesity, according to a Purdue University study.

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Reducing hospital admissions for asthmatics

Children with moderate or severe asthma attacks who are treated with systemic corticosteroids during the first 75 minutes of triage in the emergency department were 16 percent less likely to be admitted to the hospital.

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Researchers develop a new cell and animal model of inflammatory breast cancer

Inflammatory breast cancer is a very aggressive, often misunderstood type of cancer. The five-year survival rate is between 25 and 50 percent. The reason for the poor prognosis is that IBC usually grows rapidly and often spreads quickly to other parts of the body. Researchers at Fox Chase have developed a new cell and animal model that holds promise for providing a detailed understanding the disease and for developing effective interventions.

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Researchers discover a DNA marker that indicates if ovarian cancer treatment will be successful

Researchers and doctors at the North Shore-LIJ Health System and the have discovered that blood can help determine the best treatment plan for patients with ovarian cancer.

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Researchers uncover a viable way for colorectal cancer patients to overcome drug resistance

When combined with other treatments, the drug cetuximab has been shown to extend survival in certain types of cancer. Unfortunately, about 40 percent of colorectal cancer patients -- specifically those who carry a mutated form of a gene called KRAS -- do not respond to the drug. Researchers at Fox Chase, however, have been working on a way to overcome this resistance by unleashing a second cetuximab driven mechanism using a novel drug called ARI-4175.

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Rising CO2 levels linked to global warming during last deglaciation

Many scientists have long suspected that rising levels of carbon dioxide and the global warming that ended the last Ice Age were somehow linked, but establishing a clear cause-and-effect relationship between CO2 and global warming from the geologic record has remained difficult. A new study identifies this relationship and provides compelling evidence that rising CO2 caused much of the global warming.

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Role of carotenoid beta-cryptoxanthin in bone homeostasis

Bone homeostasis is maintained through a balance between osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption. Aging induces bone loss due to decreased osteoblastic bone formation and increased osteoclastic bone resorption. Osteoporosis with its accompanying decrease in bone mass is widely recognized as a major public health problem.

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Roundup can cause amphibians to change shape

When exposed to the popular herbicide Roundup, tadpoles change shape in ways that are normally induced by predators

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Scientists solving the mystery of human consciousness

Awakening from anesthesia is often associated with an initial phase of delirious struggle before the full restoration of awareness and orientation to one's surroundings.

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Scientists uncover multiple faces of deadly breast cancer

An international team of scientists, including four at Simon Fraser University, has made a discovery that will change the way the most deadly form of breast cancer is treated. The journal Nature has just published the team's findings online in the paper The clonal and mutational evolution spectrum of primary triple negative breast cancers. The study is the largest genetic analysis of what were thought to be triple negative breast cancer tumors.

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Scripps Florida scientists shed light on age-related memory loss and possible treatments

Scientists from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute have shown in animal models that the loss of memory that comes with aging is not necessarily a permanent thing.

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Sexually abused boys at risk for more unsafe sex

Young males who have been sexually abused are five times more likely to cause teen pregnancy compared to those with no abuse history, according to University of British Columbia research. Sexually abused boys are also three times more likely to have multiple sexual partners and twice as likely to engage in unprotected sex.

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Should a genetic predisposition to breast cancer be disclosed to children?

When a mother undergoes genetic testing to determine whether she carries a gene for hereditary breast cancer, the parents must then decide whether and how to share this risk information with their children.

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Some 'improved cookstoves' may emit more pollution than traditional mud cookstoves

The first real-world, head-to-head comparison of "improved cookstoves" (ICs) and traditional mud stoves has found that some ICs may at times emit more of the worrisome "black carbon," or soot, particles that are linked to serious health and environmental concerns than traditional mud stoves or open-cook fires. The report, which raises concerns about the leading hope as a clean cooking technology in the developing world, appears in ACS' journal Environmental Science &Technology.

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Soy may alleviate hot flashes in menopause, large-scale study finds

In the most comprehensive study to date to examine the effects of soy on menopause, researchers found two daily servings of soy can reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes by up to 26 percent.

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Spontaneous gene glitches linked to autism risk with older dads

Researchers have turned up a new clue to the workings of a possible environmental factor in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs): fathers were four times more likely than mothers to transmit tiny, spontaneous mutations to their children with the disorders. Moreover, the number of such transmitted genetic glitches increased with paternal age. The discovery may help to explain earlier evidence linking autism risk to older fathers.

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Stopping the spread of a deadly childhood bone cancer

Many children with the bone cancer osteosarcoma die after the tumor spreads to their lungs. In a critical step toward finding a way to stop metastasis, researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center say they have discovered an agent that prevents this cancer from spreading to the lungs in mice with the disease.

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Stress Illness > Childhood Trauma Linked to IBS Symptoms in Adults

Yet another link between emotional stress and our physical well-being has been established. According to the latest study, patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have a significantly greater prevalence of early adverse life events , including general trauma as well as physical, emotional and sexual abuse.

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Study finds link between injectable contraceptives and breast cancer risk in younger women

The first large-scale US-based study to evaluate the link between an injectable form of progestin-only birth control and breast cancer risk in young women has found that recent use of a year or more doubles the risk. The results of the study, led by breast cancer epidemiologist Christopher I. Li, M.D., Ph.D., of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, are published online ahead of the April 15 print issue of Cancer Research.

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Task force recommends reducing global harvest of 'forage fish'

A task force has strongly recommended more conservative catch limits for global "forage fish" populations. It calls for the harvest reduction of sardines, anchovies and other forage fish so that they can continue to serve as critical prey for larger species, including salmon, cod and tuna, as well as for dolphins, whales, penguins and seabirds.

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Thawing permafrost 50 million years ago led to global warming events

In a new study reported in Nature, climate scientist Rob DeConto of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and colleagues elsewhere propose a simple new mechanism to explain the source of carbon that fed a series of extreme warming events about 55 million years ago, the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, and a sequence of similar, smaller warming events afterward.

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Thawing permafrost may have led to extreme global warming events

Scientists analyzing prehistoric global warming say thawing permafrost released massive amounts of carbon stored in frozen soil of polar regions, exacerbating climate change through increasing global temperatures and ocean acidification.

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The long arm of the dendritic cell

Patients with autoimmune diseases often show a predisposition to develop "hardening of the arteries" or atherosclerosis. LMU researchers have now uncovered a mechanism that establishes a causal link between the two disorders.

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Treatment hope for muscular dystrophy

An international team led by the University of Melbourne, Australia, has found that increasing a specific protein in muscles could help treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a severe and progressive muscle wasting disease that affects young boys.

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Vanderbilt researchers help reveal complex role of genes in autism

Mutations in hundreds of genes involved in wiring the brain may contribute to the development of autism spectrum disorders. That is one of the rather daunting conclusions of a paper published in the current issue of the journal Nature by a multi-institutional team that included researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

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Viral replication impedes the efficacy of a targeted therapy against virus-induced lymphomas

Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is a human tumor virus and an etiological agent for Kaposi's sarcoma and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). PELs are aggressive lymphomas with reported median survival time shorter than six months after diagnosis. Researchers at the University of Helsinki discovered that spontaneous induction of KSHV lytic replication in tumors drastically attenuated the p53-dependent apoptotic response not only to a targeted therapy but also to genotoxic anti-cancer agents.

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Weed killer causes animal shape changes

The world's most popular weed killer can induce morphological changes in vertebrate animals. University of Pittsburgh researchers said the weed killer Roundup, in sub-lethal and environmentally relevant concentrations, caused two species of amphibians to change their shape.

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What do ADHD and cancer have in common? Variety

According to new research, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is more than one disorder. It's an entire family of disorders, much like the multiple subtypes of cancer. The research, which highlights various versions of the disease, each with differing impacts, demonstrates that there is likely not going to be a "one-size-fits-all" approach to treating patients.

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What You Need to Know About Sweeteners - Video

There are a number of natural and artificial sweeteners on the market. How can you tell which ones might be healthier? Dr. Bob DeMaria talks about a number of different sweeteners and has tips on which ones to avoid and which ones he recommends.

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Why Monsanto Thought Weeds Would Never Defeat Roundup

Since it seems to be Pest Resistance Week here at The Salt, with stories on weeds and insects, we might as well just pull out all the stops. So, next up: Why didn’t Monsanto’s scientists foresee that weeds would become resistant to glyphosate, the weed-killing chemical in their blockbuster herbicide Roundup?

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Why we have plenty of fish in the sea

New work from the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology and collaborators has pinpointed evolution in action.
 
By determining genomic sequence from many groups of stickleback fish, the scientists were able to show specific genomic changes leading to the ability of different fish populations to adapt to new environments. "We were pleased with the ability of genomics to show us what molecular changes are important in evolutionary processes," said Richard Myers, Ph.D., president and director of HudsonAlpha. 


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Women's height linked to ovarian cancer

Taller women have a slightly higher risk of ovarian cancer, according to a review of studies.

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Astaxanthine
Astaxanthine is een algen-antioxidant uit het water met een dieprode kleur. Het is de stof die waterdieren zoals de flamingo, de zalm en de kreeft rood kleurt. Astaxanthine is een antioxidant die tegenwoordig te weinig voorkomt in ons dagelijkse menu, maar in feite een ‘oerbeschermer' is. In zijn voorwoord stelt dr. Frits Muskiet dan ook de vraag of astaxanthine moet worden gerekend tot de ‘oermoleculen', die reeds werden gebruikt door de eerste levende wezens op aarde.
 

Cholesterol (remmers)
Wist je dat de cholesterol campagne immense rijkdom creëert voor onderzoekers, artsen, medicijn fabrikanten en de voedingsindustrie? Lees wat artsen en specialisten je niet zullen vertellen in dit boek.
 


Bijnieruitputting
Ben je moe of uitgeput en kun je gewoon je normale energie niet terugkrijgen, ongeacht wat je doet of hoeveel artsen je al bezocht hebt? Lees dan zeker eens dit boek.


Feiten over vetten
Het beste naslagwerk over vetten en oliën. Onder andere de rol van verzadigde vetten, door velen ten onrechte als ongezond bestempeld, wordt hierbij nader belicht.
 


Darmklachten
In Darmklachten wordt de darmproblematiek vanuit een heel nieuw gezichtspunt benaderd: centraal staan de samenhang tussen voeding en de hechting van schadelijke cellen aan de darmwand.
 


Bijwerkingen
Wist je dat:
• grote farmaceutische bedrijven ± € 35.000 per jaar per praktiserende arts besteden om de arts ertoe te bewegen hun producten voor te schrijven?
• meer dan 75 procent van de vooraanstaande wetenschappers in medicijnen betaald wordt door de farmaceutische industrie?


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