Internationaal


balk2.jpg (42734 bytes)

Google


[ Terug naar het hoofdmenu ]


Internationaal nieuws 9 maart 2012




Ontvang gratis onze wekelijkse nieuwsbrief

Name
Email


1 in 4 US HIV patients don't stay in care, Penn study shows

Only about 75 percent of HIV/AIDS patients in the United States remain in care consistently, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published online this week in AIDS. The study of patients across the United States is the first to provide a comprehensive national estimate of HIV care retention and information about patients who are most likely to continue their treatment over time.

Lees verder


Acid rain levels may control lakes’ dissolved organic matter

For decades, the concentration of dissolved organic matter, which is critical to aquatic ecosystem’s good health, has been rising in U.S. and European lakes. A new study suggests that a decrease in acid rain has driven this rise in dissolved organic matter.

Lees verder


Address barriers to housing ex-offenders, says research

Ex-offenders face significant barriers to securing accommodation, says research by University of Southampton academics from the Third Sector Research Centre.

Lees verder


Aggressive traumatic brain injury care improves outcomes, reduces long-term costs

Aggressive treatment for severe traumatic brain injuries costs more than routine care, yet yields significantly better outcomes, improved quality of life, and lower long term care costs, according to a new study by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Lees verder


Ancient 'graffiti' unlock the life of the common man

An international project led by a Tel Aviv University professor of classics is translating and analyzing ancient inscriptions from columns, stones, tombs, floors, and mosaics of ancient Israel to uncover the life of the common men -- and women -- of antiquity.

Lees verder


Animals are dying in gas-drilling country. Are humans next?

What do 17 dead cows, seven stillborn puppies, an anorexic horse, and a delirious child have in common? Unfortunately, there’s no punch line to this one. Philadelphia Inquirer, Pennsylvania.

Lees verder


Anti-gastric actions of eugenol and cinnamic acid isolated from Cinnamomi Ramulus

Taken together, eugenol and cinnamic acid, which were isolated from CR, exhibited the antioxidant activity in vitro and protective effect against gastric damage in vivo through stimulation of mucus secretion and so on. It suggested that they are useful as the neutraceuticals for gastritis.

Lees verder


Arctic Ocean drilling > Shell launches preemptive legal strike

Royal Dutch Shell launched an extraordinary preemptive legal strike Wednesday against opponents of offshore oil drilling in the Arctic Ocean, filing suit against more than a dozen environmental organizations likely to challenge its plan for drilling exploratory wells in the Chukchi Sea this summer.

Lees verder


Are you willing to swallow a recycled pill?

Can recycling medicines save the NHS millions?

Lees verder


Aspartame withdrawal and side effects explained - Here's how to protect yourself

If you have been drinking diet soda and chewing gum, chances are you have been enjoying aspartame in generous quantities.

Lees verder


Blocking natural, marijuana-like chemical in the brain boosts fat burning

Stop exercising, eat as much as you want ... and still lose weight? It sounds impossible, but UC Irvine and Italian researchers have found that by blocking a natural, marijuana-like chemical regulating energy metabolism, this can happen, at least in the lab.

Lees verder


Blood pressure drug effective for treating PTSD-related nightmares

Mayo Clinic researchers this week will announce the use of the blood pressure drug prazosin as an effective treatment to curb post- traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related nightmares.

Lees verder


BMJ admits antipsychotic drugs kill far more people than terrorism

Based on the facts, U.S. Transportation Security Administration pat-downs and naked body scans belong at drug company factories, doctors' offices, and drug stores, rather than at American airports.

Lees verder


BPA bottles now banned

The ban on import, manufacture, advertisement and sale of feeding bottles containing the organic compound Bisphenol A or BPA takes effect today.

Lees verder


Caffeine in wastewater is a tracer for human fecal contamination

Caffeine is a particularly good marker for human fecal contamination because agricultural and industrial sources of fecal coliforms generally do not release caffeine into the environment. Plus, the ubiquity of caffeine consumption means that where there is human sewage, there almost certainly will be caffeine as well. Environmental Health Perspectives.

Lees verder


CHE Partner call > Phthalates and Proposed REACH Regulations

This call scheduled for March 12th will feature Dr. Shanna Swan from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Dr. Sarah Janssen from the Natural Resources Defense Council, and Génon Jensen from the Health and Environmental Alliance.

Lees verder


CNIO scientists discover in studies with mice that an anti-cancer gene also fights obesity

Researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre working with mice have revealed that one of the main genes protecting against cancer brings two additional health benefits by boosting longevity and combating obesity. Mice carrying extra copies of the study gene eat more than normal, but are thinner -- a novel and entirely unexpected outcome.

Lees verder


Consumer group finds cancer-causing chemical in colas

In a letter to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the consumer watchdog group Center for Science in the Public Interest called on officials to ban the use of caramel coloring in popular soft drinks, citing a possible cancer risk.

Lees verder


Costs for changing pollution criteria in Florida waters likely to exceed EPA estimates

The costs to switch to numeric criteria for limiting nutrient pollutants in Florida waters are expected to exceed US Environmental Protection Agency estimates.

Lees verder


Effectiveness of Chinese herbal medicine in treating liver fibrosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

The studies on the effectiveness of Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) in treating liver fibrosis (LF) were not consistent. This study aims to systematically review the effectiveness of CHM on treating LF patients. The current inconclusive results in determining the effectiveness of CHM treatment on LF, due to the poor methodological quality and high heterogeneity of the studies, suggests that large RCTs using standardized Chinese medicine syndrome diagnosis and CHM formulae with longer follow-up are required for further evaluation.

Lees verder


EPA Identifies Group of Highly Toxic Chemicals for Risk Review

The federal Environmental Protection Agency has announced a plan to conduct comprehensive safety reviews of 83 chemicals common in consumer goods.

Lees verder


Exercise changes your DNA

Researchers reporting in the March issue of Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication, have found that when healthy but inactive men and women exercise for a matter of minutes, it produces a rather immediate change to their DNA. Perhaps even more tantalizing, the study suggests that the caffeine in your morning coffee might also influence muscle in essentially the same way.

Lees verder


Farm activist wants total ban on Bt cotton

President of Vidarbha Jan Andolan Samiti (VJAS) Kishor Tiwari has demanded a total ban on Bt cotton to save lives of the poor farmers in the region. He made the announcement in a crowded press conference on the eve of the Parliamentary Standing Committee's proposed visit to Yavatmal district on Friday.

Lees verder


FDA admits statin drugs cause diabetes, memory loss

All those doctors and medical experts who have expressed support for handing out statin drugs like candy or adding them to drinking water supplies may want to take a gander at new safety data published by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). According to the…

Lees verder


Finding your friends and following them to where you are

Computer scientists at the University of Rochester have shown that a great deal can be learned about individuals from their interactions in online social media, even when those individuals hide their Twitter messages and other posts.

Lees verder


Fish exposed to SSRIs exhibit abnormal behavior, Baylor study finds

Fish exhibit abnormal behavior and lower levels of anxiety when exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), which are common drugs used to treat depression, among other disorders. The study, by Baylor University researchers and online in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, also found that human data for drug activity can be used to predict surface water concentrations of these substances that negatively impact fish behavior.

Lees verder


From mouse to man > Circadian nitrogen balance impacts survival and susceptibility to common diseases

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine demonstrated that nitrogen balance, the process of utilizing amino acids and disposing of their toxic byproducts, occurs with a precise 24-hour rhythm -- also known as circadian rhythm -- in mammals. Disruption of this cycle has a direct impact on survival of organisms, and may predispose one to life altering diseases including diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Lees verder


GM seeds of discontent in India

Campaigners say that nearly 74 GM crops are in the pipeline and field trials for many are in progress. Farmers fear that the proposed BRAI Bill will vest too much power in the three-member authority, and the Ministry of Science and Technology which is the promoter will also be the regulator of GM crops.

Lees verder


High blood glucose levels may increase kidney disease in elderly populations

Elderly people with the metabolic syndrome -- defined as having multiple risk factors associated with developing diabetes and heart disease -- had an increased risk of chronic kidney disease, according to a recent study accepted for publication in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Lees verder


How Empires Fall (Including the American One)

An interview with Jonathan Schell, author of "The Unconquerable World," on how non-violence can topple the greatest of empires.

Lees verder


How FDA Guidelines On The Adverse Effects Of Statins Are Very Telling

The Food and Drug Administration in the US is responsible for making decisions about which drugs should be licensed. It also keeps a database of information regarding the adverse effects of drugs, and occasionally revises the warnings issued with prescription medication. One of the potential adverse effects of statins is liver damage (statins actually work in the liver to impair cholesterol production there).

Lees verder


Indian tobacco helps smokers kick the habit and repair their lungs

Before the American Indian culture was shattered, the Indians used an unprocessed tobacco in pipes ceremoniously and for healing. Yes, healing lung disorders.

Lees verder


Influencing stem cell fate

Northwestern University scientists have developed a powerful analytical method that they have used to direct stem cell differentiation. Out of millions of possibilities, they rapidly identified the chemical and physical structures that can cue stem cells to become osteocytes, cells found in mature bone. Researchers can use the method, called nanocombinatorics, to build enormous libraries of physical structures varying in size from a few nanometers to many micrometers for addressing problems within and outside biology.

Lees verder


Is aggressive treatment of severe traumatic brain injury cost effective?

Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have demonstrated that aggressive treatment of severe traumatic brain injury, which includes invasive monitoring of intracranial pressure and decompressive craniectomy, produces better patient outcomes than less aggressive measures and is cost-effective in patients no matter their age -- even in patients 80 years of age.

Lees verder


Is big pharma about to take a fall? - The Irish Times

PHARMACEUTICALS HAVE been a driving force for Ireland’s export success in recent years. Even through the darkest days of our financial collapse and recession, the sector, dominated by the large multinational players, continued to deliver export growth and a glimmer of hope of economic recovery.

Lees verder


Lung cancer risk increases with diesel exhaust exposure

Exposure to diesel exhaust increases risk for lung cancer, new evidence shows, and workers are especially at risk.

Lees verder


Marriage > A powerful heart drug in short supply

Married adults who undergo heart surgery are more than three times as likely as single people who have the same surgery to survive the next three months, a new study finds.

Lees verder


Meryl Streep interview on environmental health activism

This queen of Hollywood, nominated for 17 Academy Awards (winner of two), went green well before it was in vogue and speaks fondly of her grandmother’s recycling habits and her parents’ resourcefulness. Climate Progress.

Lees verder


Microneedle vaccine patch boosts flu protection through robust skin cell immune response

Recent research found that microneedle vaccine patches are more effective at delivering protection against influenza virus in mice than subcutaneous or intramuscular inoculation. A new, detailed analysis of the early immune responses helps explain why the skin is such fertile ground for vaccination with these tiny, virtually painless microneedles.

Lees verder


Mitochondrial dysfunction present early in Alzheimer's, before memory loss

Mitochondria - subunits inside cells that produce energy - have long been thought to play a role in Alzheimer's disease. Now Mayo Clinic researchers using genetic mouse models have discovered that mitochondria in the brain are dysfunctional early in the disease.

Lees verder


Most weight loss supplements are not effective

An Oregon State University researcher has reviewed the body of evidence around weight loss supplements and has bad news for those trying to find a magic pill to lose weight and keep it off -- it doesn't exist.

Lees verder


New brain imaging and computer modeling predicts autistic brain activity and behavior

New research from CMU's Marcel Just provides an explanation for some of autism's mysteries and gives scientists clear targets for developing intervention and treatment therapies.Just and his team used brain imaging and computer modeling to show how the brain's white matter tracts -- the cabling that connects separated brain areas -- are altered in autism and how these alterations can affect brain function and behavior.

Lees verder


New campaign says "GM wheat? No, thanks!"

GM Freeze is today launching a new campaign – called "GM Wheat? No Thanks!" – to protest the Government’s approval of an open-air field trial of GM wheat at Rothamsted Research in Hertfordshire. [1] The campaign calls on individuals, farmers and food businesses to pledge not to use or buy GM wheat, and demands that research money to be directed to more sustainable food production methods.

Lees verder


New H5N1 viruses > How to balance risk of escape with benefits of research?

In the controversy surrounding the newly developed strains of avian H5N1 flu viruses, scientists and policy makers are struggling with one question in particular: what level of biosafety is best for studying these potentially lethal strains of influenza? In a pair of commentaries, researchers from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York and the University of Michigan argue their different views of how to safely handle H5N1 flu viruses.

Lees verder


Not all calcium supplements are equal - Prevent osteoporosis with calcium hydroxyapatite

At least half of Americans over the age of 50 are at risk of developing osteoporosis, according to the Surgeon General of the United States.

Lees verder


Organic Milk > Getting What You Pay For?

The USDA’s inspector general has released a new report raising questions about whether paying $7 per gallon for organic milk is buying you a drink that’s completely free of the chemicals and genetically modified material that may be in plain old milk.

Lees verder


Pharma to clean up its act with expanded code of practice

IFPMA president and AstraZeneca chief executive David Brennan said the new code "provides a framework for the industry to act with integrity and build trust". He added that “this is not about doing the easy thing, but the right thing".

Lees verder


Pills as good as stents for some patients

Treating stable heart patients with a handful of pills works just as well as propping open blocked heart arteries with a stent, U.S. researchers said on Monday, adding to evidence that less-invasive, less-costly drug treatment works as well as implanting a medical device in such patients.

Lees verder


Pilot program demonstrates measureable benefits for people with schizophrenia

People with schizophrenia report improved functioning after participating in a new, evidence-based clinical program, according to results announced today from a six-month pilot. The program, Advancing Standards of Care for People with Schizophrenia, was spearheaded by the National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare (National Council) and administered at 10 community behavioral health organizations across the country. The program significantly improved communication, social interaction and coping skills for persons recovering from schizophrenia.

Lees verder


Plant-based diet prevents chronic diseases like coronary heart disease

The gut microbiota is very important for your health.

Lees verder


Psychopaths in Big Pharma

The Psychopath Test is a fascinating journey through the minds of madness. Jon Ronson's exploration of a potential hoax being played on the world's top neurologists takes him, unexpectedly, into the heart of the madness industry. An influential psychologist who is convinced that many important CEOs and politicians are, in fact, psychopaths teaches Ronson how to spot these high-flying individuals by looking out for little telltale verbal and nonverbal clues.

Lees verder


Report highlights understudied, unwelcome side of cancer treatment

The number of cancer survivors in the United States has tripled since 1971 and yet gains in survival have come at the price of second malignancies and cardiovascular disease, according to a long-awaited report by a national scientific committee chaired by Lois B. Travis, M.D., Sc.D., of the University of Rochester Medical Center.

Lees verder


Research on flavanols and procyanidins provides new insights into how these phytonutrients may positively impact human health

Collaborative research by Mars, Incorporated and the University of California, Davis, has provided important new insights into the distinct roles of flavanols and procyanidins in the human body.

Lees verder


Researchers discover possible approach to the treatment of aggressive breast cancer

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research in Bad Nauheim have now discovered that they can prevent the formation of metastases by blocking the receptor protein Plexin B1.

Lees verder


Researchers find possible genetic keys to surviving epithelial ovarian cancer

Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center and colleagues from 11 other institutions in the United States and the United Kingdom have used two genome-wide association studies -- one from the US and one from the UK -- to detect a novel set of genes found to be associated with epithelial ovarian cancer patient survival. The discovery could open the door to new therapies for treating epithelial ovarian cancer, the most lethal kind of gynecologic malignancy.

Lees verder


Researchers find yoga helps ease stress related medical and psychological conditions

An article by researchers from Boston University School of Medicine, New York Medical College, and the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons reviews evidence that yoga may be effective in treating patients with stress-related psychological and medical conditions such as depression, anxiety, high blood pressure and cardiac disease.

Lees verder


Stanford scientists develop gene therapy approach to grow blood vessels in ischemic limbs

A research discovery by a team of Stanford and European scientists offers hope that people with atherosclerotic disease may one day be able to avoid limb amputation related to ischemia. A new research report appearing online in the FASEB Journal suggests that the delivery of genes for two molecules naturally produced by the body, called "PDGF-BB" and "VEGF" may successfully cause the body to grow new blood vessels that can save ischemic limbs.

Lees verder


Stopping hormone therapy might help breast cancer to regress

As soon as women quit hormone therapy, their rates of new breast cancer decline, supporting the hypothesis that stopping hormones can lead to tumor regression, according to a report e-published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, & Prevention. ScienceDaily.

Lees verder


Study examines the relative roles of testosterone and its metabolite, dihydrotestosterone in men

Men receiving testosterone supplementation who also received a drug (dutasteride) commonly used to treat an enlarged prostate gland and which blocks the conversion of testosterone to its potent metabolite DHT did not experience a significant difference in changes in certain outcomes such as muscle mass, muscle strength, or sexual function compared to men who did not receive dutasteride, according to a study in the March 7 issue of JAMA.

Lees verder


Study reveals how protein machinery binds and wraps DNA to start replication

Scientists have deciphered molecular-level details of the complex choreography by which intricate cellular proteins recognize and bind to DNA to start the DNA replication process. The research may point to ways to block unwanted cell division.

Lees verder


Supplements > Too Much of a Good Thing?

A new review adds to mounting evidence that dietary supplements may do more harm than good. Selenium, a mineral found in fish, meat, eggs, grains and certain nuts, helps boost antioxidant activity in the body to potentially ward off chronic diseases.

Lees verder


The challenges of cancer vaccines

The first therapeutic cancer vaccine has now been approved by the FDA, and a diverse range of therapeutic cancer vaccines directed against a spectrum of tumor-associated antigens are currently being evaluated in clinical trials, according to a review published March 6 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Lees verder


The loss of a protein makes 'jump' the tumor to the lymph node

A study, led by the researcher at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, Manel Esteller, published in the Journal of Pathology, had identified a mechanism that explains how cancer cells escape from its original site to the lymph nodes. Investigations have uncovered that metastatic tumor cells that grow in the lymph nodes of patients with melanoma and head and neck tumors lose the activity of a protein called cadherin-11.

Lees verder


The One and Only Way You Can Tell if a Food is GMO-Free

Story at-a-glance Vermont has recently introduced bill H.722, requiring labeling of foods containing genetically engineered ingredients. Such products would also be prohibited

Lees verder


Tobacco companies can't be forced by FDA to use graphic warnings

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration was blocked by a federal judge from requiring tobacco companies to put graphic health warnings on cigarette packaging. Bloomberg News.

Lees verder


Traumatic Brain Injury Impairs Financial Decision Making Skills

People who experience a TBI show a marked decline in the ability to make appropriate financial decisions in the immediate aftermath and a continued impairment on complex financial skills six months later, according to new research from UAB.

Lees verder


UCLA scientists pinpoint how vitamin D may help clear amyloid plaques found in Alzheimer's

A team of academic researchers has identified the intracellular mechanisms regulated by vitamin D3 that may help the body clear the brain of amyloid beta, the main component of plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease. The early findings show that vitamin D3 may activate key genes and cellular signaling networks to help stimulate the immune system to clear the amyloid-beta protein.

Lees verder


UCLA scientists uncover mechanism for melanoma drug resistance

Researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have uncovered how an advanced form of melanoma gets around an inhibitor, Zelboraf, which targets the mutated BRAF gene.

Lees verder


Unnecessary induction of labor increases risk of cesarean section and other complications

A new study published in the journal Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica reveals that induction of labor at term in the absence of maternal or fetal indications increases the risk of cesarean section and other postpartum complications for the woman, as well as neonatal complications.

Lees verder


Video - Hongchi Xiao Beyond 2012

Hongchi Xiao Beyond 2012discussses health "health diet" spirituality discussion at the Spen beyond2012Confernce in Newton Hotel, Nairn, near Inverness, Scotland, with Anne Margrethe Hess of the Home Planet Network, Norway.

Lees verder


Video - Preparing Trees and Shrubs

Howard Garrett, also known as "The Dirt Doctor" helps you better prepare your trees and shrubs for planting. His tips should help get your plant off to a better start.

Lees verder


Video - The Role of Antioxidants

Dr. Mercola discusses what free radicals are and what antioxidants are. He illustrates how oxidation damages organs and how antioxidants can help prevent oxidative stress.

Lees verder


Vitamin D deficiency linked to higher mortality in female nursing home residents

The majority of institutionalized elderly female patients are vitamin D deficient and there is an inverse association of vitamin D deficiency and mortality, according to a recent study accepted for publication in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Lees verder


War veterans with mental health diagnoses more likely to receive prescription opioids for pain

Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans with mental health diagnoses, particularly post-traumatic stress disorder, are more likely to receive prescription opioid medications for pain-related conditions, have higher-risk opioid use patterns and increased adverse clinical outcomes associated with opioid use than veterans with no mental health diagnoses, according to a study in the March 7 issue of JAMA.

Lees verder


Washing polished rice can slash cesium level

Consumers need not worry too much about eating rice contaminated with cesium, provided that the grain is polished and thoroughly washed before serving, according to a recent study.

Lees verder


Why Parents Should Stop Coddling Their Kids and Let Them Live Their Own Lives

I see the damage that anxious overparenting has created. So, in my home, I'm trying something different.

Lees verder


With extra gene, mice are footloose and cancer free

In a perfect world, we could eat to our heart's content without sacrificing our health and good looks, and now it appears that maybe we can. Mice with an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene lose weight even as their appetites grow. Not only that, but according to the report in the March issue of the Cell Press journal Cell Metabolism, the animals also live longer, and that isn't just because they aren't getting cancer, either.

Lees verder


[ Terug naar het hoofdmenu ]


 

 


View My Stats